The Beacon

Mercury Pollution Reduction Act introduced in Senate

Today, Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) introduced the Mercury Pollution Reduction Act (S. 1428) in the U.S. Senate. The bill, co-sponsored by Senators Benjamin Cardin (D-MD), Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Russ Feingold (D-WI), would phase-out the use of mercury technology in domestic chlorine production within two years.
Specifically, it would require four renegade chlorine plants in the U.S. to transition to mercury-free technology for the production of chlorine and caustic soda.

You
may recall that I href="http://community.oceana.org/blog/2009/06/help-mercury-bill-keep-moving">posted
recently about the House version of the bill, H.R. 2190. The House bill was voted out of subcommittee for consideration by the full Energy and Commerce Committee.  In addition, over 10,000 of our WaveMaker activists have emailed their Representative and/or Senator about the bill.

While 95 percent of chlorine produced in the United States uses a
mercury-free process, four U.S. plants have continued to use outdated,
mercury-dependent technology to produce chlorine and caustic soda.
Mercury pollution contaminates seafood and can affect the health of
humans and wildlife exposed to it.

“Mercury
contamination in our air, land and water is a serious health threat;
and when there’s technology readily available to reduce
mercury pollution, we should use it,” said Senator
Whitehouse, a member of the Senate Committee on the Environment and
Public Works. “I’m grateful for Oceana’s
work to highlight the dangers of mercury and appreciate their
support.” 

Please href="http://takeaction.oceana.org/t/6438/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=11">take
action to help get the bill passed!  You can also
read more about the href="http://oceana.org/north-america/what-we-do/stop-seafood-contamination/the-problem/mercurys-health-effects/">health
effects of mercury and href="http://oceana.org/north-america/what-we-do/stop-seafood-contamination/chlorine-plant-campaign/">our
campaign to make sure the whole US chlorine industry switches
to mercury-free technology.


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