The Beacon

Blog Tags: Climate Change

Ocean Roundup: Seals Can Pick up Pings from Acoustic Tags on Fish, Climate Change Making Crabs “Sluggish,” and More

Grey seals may be able to detect pings from fishing gear

Grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) in Santander bay, Cantabria, Spain. New research shows grey seals may be able to pick up pings from acoustic tags on fish. (Photo: Oceana / Enrique Talledo)

- New research shows that seals are picking up on the pings from acoustic tags on fish. Through experiments, the researchers found that seals located fish with acoustic tags on them more easily than untagged fish. BBC News


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Extroverted Sharks and Stressed Penguins: Uncovering Personality in Ocean Animals

Native little penguins have different personalities

Native little penguins’ personality may play a role in their ability to cope with climate change. (Photo: M Kuhn / Flickr Creative Commons)

Though it’s easy to see that our domesticated four-legged friends have quirky personalities, new studies show that some ocean animals may just have their own, too. And not only do some animals have unique personalities, but their disposition may just play unique evolutionary roles.


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Ocean News: Loggerhead Sea Turtles Can Get the Bends, Global Sea Surface Temperatures at Highest Point, and More

Loggerhead sea turtles can get the bends after interaction with fisheries

A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) in the Mediterranean. New research shows loggerheads can get the bends after commercial fishing capture. (Photo:  Oceana / Juan Cuetos)

- The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) announced that it was adding Pacific bluefin tuna to their "red list" of threatened species during the 2014 World Parks Congress in Sydney. The group cited its massive demand in Asian sushi and sashimi markets as reasons for population declines over the past 22 years. Business Insider


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Ocean Roundup: Gulf of Maine Cod Fishery Closed, Climate Change Worsening Dead Zones, and More

Fishery managers closed the Gulf of Maine fishery

Cod (Gadus morhua). Fishery managers closed the Gulf of Maine cod fishery for six months. (Photo: Oceana / Carlos Minguell)

- Researchers have discovered that they can examine how much plastic debris seabirds ingest on the open ocean by studying its concentration in birds’ preening oil. The scientists say this will help them understand how trash is affecting other marine species. ABC


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Scientists Alarmed about Climate Change Catastrophe

New IPCC synthesis issued dire warning about climate change

A polar bear in the Arctic. (Photo: Smudge 9000 / Flickr Creative Commons)

“Human influence on the climate system is clear, and recent anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are the highest in history.  Recent climate changes have had widespread impacts on human and natural systems.”


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Ocean Roundup: New Robot to Study Emperor Penguins, IPCC Sounds Alarm on Climate Change Inaction, and More

A new robot will help scientists study penguins in Antarctica

Emperor penguins in Antarctica. (Photo: Christopher Michel / Flickr Creative Commons)

- Scientists have invented a remote-controlled robotic emperor penguin, which resembles an emperor penguin chick, to help them better study emperor penguins in Antarctica. Because emperor penguins are extremely shy, they tend to back away and change their natural behavior whenever scientists try to study them. The Associated Press


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Ocean News: Sea Turtle Nesting in Florida Sees Steady Increase, 2014 Could Be Hottest on Record, and More

Sea turtle nesting in Florida has seen a steady increase

A leatherback sea turtle hatchling. Sea turtle nesting has increased in Florida in recent years. (Photo: Tim Calver / Oceana)

- New research shows that male bluefin killifish have varying colorations and markings on their fins to signal different messages. Even though most field guides show one fin of the killifish to be blue, researchers found they also came in yellow and red. Science Daily


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Ocean Roundup: Fish Finding It Difficult to Adapt to Climate Change, Oceans Warmer Than Thought, and More

Spiny damselfish could take generations to adapt to climate change

Spiny damselfish (Acanthochromis polyacanthus). Juvenile spiny damselfish are having a difficult time adjusting to climate change. (Photo: Nikita / Wikimedia Commons)

- New research shows that fish aren’t quickly adapting to climate change, and it may take them several generations to do so. Researchers found that young spiny damselfish fish were no better than their parents at adapting to higher CO2 levels in seawater. The Guardian


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Video: Leonardo DiCaprio Speaks up for the Planet at UN Climate Summit

Leonardo DiCaprio Spoke at the UN Climate Summit

Leonardo DiCaprio speaking at the UN Climate Summit at the UN Headquarters in New York City. (Photo: The Daily Conversation / YouTube)

Earlier this week, actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio addressed world leaders at the opening of the UN Climate Summit about climate change. His moving speech noted that clear evidence of climate change is in effect, ranging from shifting weather patterns to acidifying oceans, and urged these leaders to step up and take action before it’s too late.


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Video: Ocean Acidification Masking Sharks’ Sense of Smell

Ocean acidication hurts sharks' ability to smell food

Smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis). Acidic seawater has been found to impact their sense of smell. (Photo: EricksonSmith / Flickr Creative Commons)

Ocean acidification is already making it harder for fish to find friends, for corals to grow, and for mussels to remain attached to hard surfaces, just to name a few effects.


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