The Beacon

Blog Tags: Climate Change

Jackie Savitz Talks Climate and the Oceans

In the 100 days leading up to the climate conference in Copenhagen, the British Embassy here in DC has been showcasing one person a day who is taking action to stop climate change. Yesterday, Day 95, Oceana's own campaign director Jackie Savitz was featured. Here's Jackie's 100 second video:

 


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Arctic Protections Finalized

In a definitive victory for the Arctic, the government released final regulations protecting almost 200,000 square miles of U.S. Arctic waters from industrial fishing.

The new regulations, which close all U.S. waters north of Alaska’s Bering Strait to commercial fishing, will be effective starting December 3, 2009. The closure will allow for more time to assess the health of Arctic ocean ecosystems and the potential impacts of large-scale fishing given the impacts the Arctic is already facing from climate change and ocean acidification.

And don't forget the looming threat of offshore oil drilling in the Arctic. Last month the government approved a plan for drilling in the Beaufort Sea next summer, and a similar plan for the Chukchi Sea is currently under review with a decision expected this month. 

Conservationists, scientists, and local communities agree that the science-based precautionary approach we have achieved with industiral fishing should be replicated with oil, especially given the higher risks of oil spills in the Arctic and the inability to contain, control or clean up an accident in the icy waters of the Arctic.

Congratulations to everyone who helped make this happen!


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Sam Waterston on Acidification

Oceana board member Sam Waterston penned an op-ed on the crisis of ocean acidification for CNN.com today. Here's an excerpt: 

The current acidification level hasn't been seen for at least 800,000 years, and acidification is coming on 100 times faster than at any point for hundreds of thousands for years. The levels are alarming. The rate of change makes them even scarier, because it so restricts the ability of sea creatures to adapt.

In contrast to the debate that continues about the causal relationship between this or that weather event and human activity, there is no debate about the source of ocean acidification. The change in the chemistry of the ocean is a man-made event, plain and simple, and the consequences of its continuing rise in acidity will belong squarely to us.

It will make for some uncomfortable moments around the dinner table when our children and grandchildren ask, "What did you do in the [climate] war, Daddy?" If we don't recognize the ocean's warning, the first cataclysm from man-made carbon dioxide emissions that will get our attention will be the collapse of the oceans.

If we do recognize the warning, the oceans are ready to be a solution. Power in the tides and waves is there to tap. Offshore wind power is a technology that's ready to go right now, near the great population centers on our coasts, where it's most needed.


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Whale Wednesday: Save the Carbon Sinks

sperm whale

A sperm whale fluke. © Oceana/Jesus Renedo

There’s no shortage of blame to go around when it comes to climate change. Individuals are responsible for poor consumer choices; we drive the wrong cars, use the wrong light bulbs, even wash our laundry on the wrong setting. Even the poor dairy cow shares the blame for having the nerve to burp methane emissions. But Bessie isn’t the only creature catching a bad rap. Sperm whales have been criticized for breathing. Yes, breathing. Apparently the carbon dioxide emitted from the roughly 210,000 sperm whales in the Southern Ocean is contributing to global warming, producing in the ballpark of 17 million tons of carbon a year. But new research suggests that we’re missing a very big factor in the calculation. It’s not just what the whales put out, but also what they take in.


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Blogging to Save the World

Today, everyone from British Prime Minister Gordon Brown to Google is blogging about climate change as a part of Blog Action Day 2009.

And with the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen (Dec 7 - 18) just around the corner, this year's theme is especially relevant.

Check out featured climate posts today at http://www.blogactionday.org/ and take action with them to stop climate change. Also, next week, 350.org is hosting the International Day of Climate Action -- check out the site to learn more about how you can get involved.

So one way or another, today's a good day to find a way to do your part, no matter how small it may be, to save our planet from catastrophic climate change.


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