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Blog Tags: Loggerhead Sea Turtle

Tiny Transmitters Reveal Where Young Sea Turtles Travel

(Photo: Jim Abernethy)

The oceans are a massive place, and scientists are still discovering some of the very basic facts of life for many marine creatures. Take the loggerhead sea turtle — until this month, scientists weren’t sure where young loggerheads went during the first few years of their life. But with the help of tiny transmitters, researchers recently discovered where young loggerhead sea turtles journey during these mysterious “lost years.”


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Sea Turtle Protection: The Simple Truth

(Photo: USFWS)

Atlantic fisheries kill hundreds of loggerhead sea turtles every year, as turtles are caught as bycatch and become trapped or drown in nets. This killing, however, can easily be avoided. There are known, proven solutions to this problem, like requiring more vessels to use turtle excluder devices (TEDs). But federal agencies continue to ignore the problems at hand and allow fisheries to operate in harmful ways.


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Oceana In Action at the Nautica Malibu Triathlon

The Oceana team raced hard to help protect loggerhead sea turtles. (Photo: Oceana)

Earlier this month, Oceana celebrated its golden anniversary at the Nautica Malibu Triathlon by doing what it does best – racing to save the oceans. Among the sands of Zuma Beach, the crash of the Pacific Ocean and the crush of thousands of spandex-clad triathletes, Oceana’s group of five athletes and seven volunteers was responsible for raising $1,000 for Oceana and gathering 265 signatures on a petition in support of establishing widespread critical habitat for loggerhead sea turtles.


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Creature Feature: Loggerhead Sea Turtle

A loggerhead sea turtle. (Photo: Wendell Reed)

If you're a fan of sea turtles, you might have heard about the mighty loggerhead sea turtle. Growing 2 to 3 feet long and weighing in at a massive 165–350 pounds, loggerheads are heavier than many people. These reptiles are actually the second-largest marine turtle (only the leatherback is larger.) Named for their hefty heads, loggerheads are found in tropical and temperate waters around the world.


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GREAT NEWS: Proposal Will Protect Loggerhead Sea Turtle Habitat in Coastal Waters Off Six States

New proposal would protect loggerhead nesting grounds in the waters off North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Photo: Alejandro Linares Garcia

We're thrilled to share some great news with you -- After more than five years of delay, the federal government finally proposed to protect 36 areas of ocean habitat across six states for loggerhead sea turtles, in response to a lawsuit filed by Oceana, the Center for Biological Diversity, and the Turtle Island Restoration Network. After the government failed to respond to petitions to strengthen protections for loggerhead populations from as far back as 2007, we joined with these two other conservation groups to bring the lawsuit. The new proposal by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to protect the waters off of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi, comes as a direct result of this lawsuit!


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Oceana Launches Lawsuit to Protect Sea Turtles

Loggerheads need protection ©Wikimedia Commons

Oceana, along with the Center for Biological Diversity and the Turtle Island Restoration Network, announced last week that they intend to sue the federal government over its failure to designate critical habitat areas for loggerhead sea turtles in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans – an action required under the Endangered Species Act but that has not yet been done.

Loggerhead sea turtles currently face threats from commercial fisheries, habitat destruction, and climate change along our coasts and throughout the Gulf of Mexico. Unfortunately population recovery efforts are slow, as turtles are long-lived animals that typically don’t reach sexual maturity until 20-35 years of age.

The designation of critical habitat is expected to help restore plummeting population numbers, as species with identified critical habitat are more than twice as likely to show recovery in overall numbers. The designation of critical habitat will likely protect nesting and foraging grounds that are important to the survival and recovery of these turtles.

In order to designate critical habitat, the federal government must first identify areas that are essential to the survival and recovery of the species.  More than 90 percent of the U.S. Atlantic nesting population of loggerheads nests on U.S. beaches along the eastern coast of Florida.   Critical habitat designation is vital to the survival and recovery of threatened and endangered species. Every day the government delays means more turtles caught in nets and more habitat areas destroyed without consideration of the impacts on the population.


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The Great Sea Turtle Migration Mystery: Solved?

Just call him Magellan: this loggerhead has a built-in navigation system. ©Oceana/Cory Wilson

It’s one of the most miraculous journeys in the natural world: sea turtles travel thousands of miles across the ocean to return to the very beach where they first scuttled into the sea.  

There aren’t exactly brightly lit mile markers in the sea, so how they do it? Scientists from the University of North Carolina (my alma mater!) say they have figured it out.

The researchers say that loggerhead sea turtles appear to be able to determine their longitude using the strength and angle of the Earth's magnetic field. Although several species of turtles are known to use magnetic cues to determine latitude, it had never been shown for longitude.

I didn’t realize this, but apparently the most difficult part of open-sea navigation is determining longitude (east-west position.) While human navigators struggled for centuries to figure it out on long-distance voyages, loggerhead hatchlings are naturals as soon as they hit the water.

To carry out the research loggerhead hatchlings were placed in circular water containers and tethered to electronic tracking systems to monitor their swimming direction.

You can read more about the research in Current Biology, and help protect sea turtles by telling President Obama to support comprehensive protections for the ancient mariners.


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A Bad Year for Loggerheads

loggerhead sea turtle

A female loggerhead on Bald Head Island, NC. © Oceana/Jeff Janowski

During my turtle trip to Bald Head Island, NC in June, the loggerhead nesting numbers were looking dismal, but it was fairly early in the season, so the folks at the Island Conservancy were hoping things would turn around. It turns out Bald Head had its worst nesting year on record since 1983.

This year's loggerhead nesting numbers are in, and yesterday Oceana announced that this year was one of the worst on record from North Carolina to Florida. In Florida, which accounts for nearly 90 percent of loggerhead nesting in the United States, nesting decreased by more than 15 percent in 2009.


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