The Beacon

Blog Tags: Manatees

Ocean Roundup: UN Sounds Alarm on Mangrove Disappearance, Brazil to Triple Marine Protected Areas, and More

A new UN report warns that mangroves are disappearing

Mangroves in Elbow Reef, Key Largo, Florida. The U.N. has issued a report warning about mangrove disappearance. (Photo: Oceana / Carlos Minguell)

- Brazil is planning to triple its Marine Protected Areas from 5.5 million hectares to over 17.5 million—a project that’s worth more than $18 million. The projected is intended to benefit the 43 million people who live along Brazil’s coast by securing a local food supply, maintaining water quality, and increasing coastal resilience. MercoPress


Continue reading...

Ocean News: Manatees Could Lose Endangered Status, Ocean Acidification Causing Fish to Lose Their Friends, and More

Manatee.

(Photo: Oceana)

- Earlier this week, U.S. Coast Guard officials found 65 dead sharks in an illegal drift net 20 miles off South Padre Island, Texas. An airplane spotted the mile-long net and decomposing sharks, and immediately deployed a patrol boat. Houston Chronicle


Continue reading...

Photos: Tips for Protecting Coastal Wildlife This Fourth of July Weekend

Leatherback sea turtle hatchling

A leatherback sea turtle hatchling (Dermochelys coriacea). (Photo: Oceana / Tim Calver)

Who doesn’t love hitting the beach for the Fourth of July? Whether you’re camping on your own remote barrier island or visiting a populated beach, the Fourth is a great time to enjoy the beach.


Continue reading...

Red Tide Takes a Toll on Florida Manatees

Algae threatens this shapely sirenian. Photo: USGS

Over the last two months, 180 manatees have been found dead along the coasts of Florida. The friendly and well-loved creatures of Florida’s waters are currently being threatened by an outbreak of red tide, an algal bloom which has proved to be toxic to the species.

A harmful toxin in the algae enters the nervous system of the manatees and prevents them from being able to breathe, which then causes them to drown. Some studies show that the algae may be linked to climate change and increasing global atmospheric temperatures because the algae blooms in warm temperatures. This detrimental algae has led to a record number of manatee deaths in the last two months and will likely continue to do so for the next several months. Many scientists and veterinarians are making valiant efforts to help prevent further manatee deaths, but not all of the creatures can be saved.

There are less than 5,000 Florida manatees inhabiting U.S. waters, and this number is shrinking every day. Manatees are endangered in the U.S. and protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act and Florida Manatee Sanctuary Act.  Despite this, their numbers continue to decline.

With the growing threat of extinction, it is becoming increasingly important to rescue and protect as many of these creatures as possible. These large mammals are also being threatened by various types of human activity including fishing vessel activity and recreational boating, with as many as 80 animals being killed every year in boat collisions. It is extremely important to protect this species in order to maintain the biodiversity of the oceans and the earth. We must take steps to further the protection of these creatures as well as the many other sea animals that are facing population declines and possible extinction.


Continue reading...

Fact of the Day: Dugong

dugong

Dugong (credit: Julien Willem)

Today’s FOTD is about the strangely adorable dugong, which is closely related to both the manatee and the elephant. 

Dugongs, often called sea cows, use their split tail and paddle-like front flippers to slowly maneuver while grazing on sea grasses in shallow waters. They uproot the grasses with their fleshy lips and gently shake their food to avoid ingesting large amounts of sediment. 


Continue reading...

Browse by Date