The Beacon

Blog Tags: Ocean Acidification

Ocean Roundup: Costa Rica Restricts Industrial Tuna Fishing, West Coast Sea Stars May Be Making a Comeback, and More

Sea stars may be reviving on the West Coast

A sunflower sea star. Sea stars are said to be making a comeback from sea star wasting syndrome. (Photo: light-bends / Flickr Creative Commons)

- The United Kingdom’s chief scientist is sounding the alarm on climate change, warning that the oceans can only absorb about one-third of what they’re emitting. His warning comes after new studies highlight how ocean acidification affects animals from sea urchins to lugworms. BBC News


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Ocean Roundup: Great Barrier Reef Health “Never Been Worse,” Coral Could Be New Substitute for Bone Grafts, and More

Coal ports and development threatens the Great Barrier Reef

The Ribbon Reef, located within the Great Barrier Reef. Reef health has been heavily compromised by development along the coast. (Photo: Richard Ling / Flickr Creative Commons)

- A new report found that ospreys don’t carry “significant” amounts of pharmaceutical chemicals, despite widespread presence in waters and some fish. This was the first study that looked at bioaccumulation of chemicals in osprey food webs. EurekAlert


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Ocean Roundup: Federal Agencies Called Out on Ocean Acidification Inaction, Steller Sea Lions May Have a New Predator, and More

Pacific sleeper sharks may be preying on steller sea lions

Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) pups. New research shows Pacific sleeper sharks may be preying on Steller sea lions. (Photo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife / Flickr Creative Commons)

- The Government Accountability Office has called out federal agencies for not implementing key parts of a 2009 law on ocean acidification, like estimating research costs. Some say that the news is troubling, especially since the federal government plays a key role in addressing ocean acidification. The Hill


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Ocean Roundup: Seaweed Transporting Disease to Sea Otters, Lego to Break Ties with Shell, and More

Seaweed particles are helping spread disease among sea otters

Seaweed particles are helping spread disease among sea otters. (Photo: Vicki & Chuck Rogers / Flickr Creative Commons)

- Scientists have recently discovered that some mangroves are offering coral reef shelter and protection from climate change. In Hurricane Hole, a mangrove habitat in the U.S. Virgin Islands, scientists found 30 species of coral growing underwater. Science Daily


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Video: Ocean Acidification Masking Sharks’ Sense of Smell

Ocean acidication hurts sharks' ability to smell food

Smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis). Acidic seawater has been found to impact their sense of smell. (Photo: EricksonSmith / Flickr Creative Commons)

Ocean acidification is already making it harder for fish to find friends, for corals to grow, and for mussels to remain attached to hard surfaces, just to name a few effects.


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Ocean Roundup: Leatherback Coloration May Play Important Role, UK Sees New Voluntary Seafood Labeling Scheme, and More

Leatherback pink spots may help with their migration

A leatherback sea turtle. Leatherback “pink spots” may play an important physiological role. (Photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region / Flickr Creative Commons)

- Researchers have discovered that the “pink spot” on leatherback sea turtles’ heads may actually play a useful physiological role. It may detect sunlight patterns, clueing leatherbacks into changes in seasonal patterns to inform their migrational and foraging habits. Smithsonian


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Ocean Roundup: Acidification Masking Shark Smelling Abilities, New Fishery Rule to Protect Endangered Albatross, and More

Smooth dogfish could lose their sense of smell from acidification

A smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis). (Photo: Erickson Smith / Flickr Creative Commons)

- NOAA has proposed a new rule to for West Coast commercial fishermen that intends to the endangered short-tailed albatross, a seabird whose numbers are down to 1,200 individuals. The rule requires fishermen to deploy streamer lines, already required off Alaska and Hawaii, which would scare off albatross from eating bait. The Associated Press


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Ocean Roundup: Big Bluefin Tuna Gain Protection from Fisheries, Commercial Fishermen Quickly Losing Consumer Trust, and More

NOAA made amendments to its bluefin tuna management plan

Bluefin tuna (Thynnus thynnus) gained protection in the U.S. recently. (Photo: Oceana / Keith Ellenbogen)

- NOAA recently made amendments to its bluefin tuna management plan in an effort to reduce the number of bluefin tuna killed by commercial fishing vessels. The new rules say that commercial fishermen cannot catch giant bluefin tuna—fish longer than 81 inches—in the Gulf of Mexico or western Atlantic. NPR


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Ocean Roundup: Florida Receives Federal Help for Oyster Recovery, Climate Change Linked to Iceland’s Puffin Decline, and More

Puffin nesting has declined in Iceland

An Icelandic puffin. (Photo: Martin Ystenes / Flickr Creative Commons)

- Florida is receiving $6 million from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for oyster recovery in  Apalachicola Bay in northwest Florida—a fishery that crashed in 2012 and 2013. The money will go towards oyster recovery, oyster monitoring, community assistance, and other outlets. WCTV


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Ocean News: Barbuda Becomes Ocean Conservation Leader in the Caribbean, July Ocean Temperatures Hit Record Highs, and More

Barbuda is a leader in ocean conservation in the Caribbean

A rocky ledge off Barbuda. (Photo: Ron Kroetz / Flickr Creative Commons)

- Scientists say that seagrass habitat is being lost at the same rate as Amazon rain forests, or about two soccer fields per hour. The scientists warn that this is key habitat for many young fish, so the loss of seagrass could have a huge impact on fisheries. BBC


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