The Beacon

Blog Tags: Ocean Conservation

Ted Danson on CBS Sunday Morning

On Sunday CBS aired a great piece on the always lovable Ted Danson, of “Cheers” and Oceana Board of Directors fame.

In addition to conducting part of the interview dressed as Don Quixote for an episode of “Bored to Death” , Ted talks about his passion for ocean conservation and the need to view ocean issues through the lens of food security and jobs.

Check it out and get his book , “Oceana: Our Endangered Oceans and What You Can Do to Save Them,” if you haven’t yet – it would make a great gift for anyone on your list, and a portion of the proceeds go towards our work to protect the oceans.


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Q&A: Model + Ocean Lover Cheyne Oglesby

cheyne oglesby surfing

Model Cheyne Oglesby catches a wave. © Abbey Matson

Cheyne Oglesby spends his days as a model with Ford Models, and we met him at Nautica’s Fashion Week presentation this fall. But when he’s not in front of the camera, he loves to be in the water – preferably surfing.

I asked him a few questions about his love for the oceans:

Tell me about your connection to the oceans.

CO: The ocean has always played an important role in my life. I feel like the ocean gives me sanity. My parents put me in the water at an early age and I've always loved it.

You travel a lot for photo shoots -- do you get to take time off in cool spots to surf?

CO: Whenever I'm fortunate enough to shoot at a location with surf, I try to take full advantage, usually by staying as long as possible when the job is over. Canary Islands were amazing! Beautiful black sand beaches, and dust blowing in the afternoon from the Sahara Desert, WILD!

What’s your favorite place to surf and why?

CO: My favorite coastal place to surf is a two-way tie between Hawaii and Australia. Hawaii has so many different breaks and the water is always warm, which I love, and Australia is just amazing all the way around, great breaks, amazing people and fun nightlife.

What’s the coolest thing you’ve seen out on the water?

CO: I would have to say the coolest thing I've seen/experienced in the water is sharing waves with dolphins. I love dolphins -- they are the best "surfers" in the world.

What about the saddest?

CO: It's really sad to see the beaches closed after a storm, due to storm drains over filling and run-off.  I've found some pretty unsavory things on the beach like needles, garbage and plastics. 

Do you have a particular ocean conservation issue you are passionate about? Why do you think it’s important to protect the oceans?

CO: I'm really concerned about the amount of plastic that's in the ocean, it's not just plastic you can see, it's also tiny particles that break down and tend to mimic krill and are being consumed by mass quantities of birds and fish. It's messing up the entire ecosystem. We need to protect the ocean not only for ourselves but for future generations to enjoy, the ocean gives life and is vital in the circle of life.


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Josh Lucas Joins Oceana in Oregon

Earlier this summer, actor Josh Lucas traveled to the Oregon Coast with Oceana, Nautica and GQ to explore the area’s unique marine environment.

Lucas visited picturesque Yaquina Head, a promontory southwest of Portland known for its views of the gray whale migration route and seabird nesting areas. Here he is on the water:

 “We were all inside a landscape that was electrifying and it made you understand why the conservation movement is so profound and important,” Lucas told GQ. “That’s the thing I’ve learned working with Oceana: If you deplete one little place like the ocean waters off Cascade Head—which is so magnificent and so lush with life—that depletion begins this domino effect that rings true across a large area.”

You can read more about Lucas’s journey at the GQ Gentlemen’s Fund. Needless to say, we’re thrilled that he has joined the cause to protect the world’s oceans.

Josh Lucas appeared in the Oscar-winning “A Beautiful Mind," and will also appear in NBC’s forthcoming drama “The Firm.” Catch him as Charles Lindbergh in “J.Edgar,” opposite Leonardo DiCaprio and Judi Dench, in theaters this fall.


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Kate Walsh: My Ocean Inspiration

kate walsh

© Tim Calver

I had the good fortune to spend quite a bit of time in and around the ocean and sea during the last few months of my hiatus from “Private Practice,” both for work and for pleasure.

My love for the oceans is obvious, to be sure, but nothing reinvigorates my commitment to keeping our oceans clean, sustainable and beautiful more than swimming, snorkeling, sailing and swimming in them.  

The waters off the coast of Anguilla and the Bahamas are so clean, clear and warm and I got to see so much ocean life, from a vast array of colorful fish to the lush and intact coral reefs. I also love to visit the azure waters of the Aegean Sea that surrounds the islands of Mykonos and Santorini. 

Last month, I placed a banner on my website encouraging my fans to “Be an Ocean Hero” this summer (I pledged to clean my local beach.) So I was a little surprised (and very humbled and flattered) when some of these people – The Walshies as they’re affectionately known – wrote me to relate how my involvement with Oceana inspired them to become advocates too.

With that in mind, I’d like to share with you a few inspirational notes from The Walshies that reveal the capacity for the oceans to inspire and the power each of us holds to encourage our friends, family (or even fans) to get active in their protection:

Nicole (Miami, FL): After hearing about Oceana's Be an Ocean Hero pledge, now I too look beyond to what lies ahead, not only the superficial aspect of our waterways. Thanks Kate and thanks Oceana!


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Ted on The Diane Rehm Show

ted danson

Ted Danson. © Kate Danson

Last Thursday Oceana board member Ted Danson was the featured guest on WAMU’s The Diane Rehm Show. He covers a lot of ground in the hour, including overfishing, seafood fraud, aquaculture and bottom trawling.

He explains to Diane,

“…It's one of those amazing potential worldwide disasters that does not have to happen. It's a great story. Hey, how did -- hey, grandma and grandpa, what did you do when you found out that we were fishing out our oceans? To be able to turn around and say, well, this is what I did and this is why we still have fish. That's an exciting thing. We should not be overwhelmed by this. We should educate ourselves. We should let science lead the way and then you pass laws to change policy and you enforce those laws.”

Have a listen and don’t forget to check out Ted’s new book, “Oceana: Our Endangered Oceans and What We Can Do to Save Them.”


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Slideshow: NYC World Oceans Day Clean-up

How did you celebrate World Oceans Day? Oceana headed straight to the river. Teaming up with Nautica, we braved the heat and skimmed trash out of the Hudson River in an effort to protect both the river’s natural beauty and the health of its marine life.

What did we find? Fewer cigarette butts than you might think, but plenty of bags, bottle caps and other plastic debris – just the types of trash that are most dangerous to fish and other aquatic life that may end up ingesting or becoming entangled in the plastic.

If you missed World Oceans Day, don’t worry! You can still pledge to be an ocean hero throughout the summer by committing to cleaning up your local waterway, eating sustainable seafood, or recycling.


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How to Be an Ocean Hero this Summer

© zeroXTE.com

It's World Oceans Day, so what better time to take a moment to think about doing your part to help protect our water planet?

Don’t worry, you don’t have to be a Peter Wallerstein or a Sophi Bromenshenkel to be an everyday ocean hero. This summer, we’re asking everyone to take small steps in their lives to help the oceans. Those little things all add up to heroic efforts.

When you pledge to be an ocean hero with us, you can choose between three options -- clean up your local waterway, eat sustainable seafood or recycle. Here’s the skinny:

1. Clean up your local beach or waterway.

There’s a lot of litter on beaches and riverbanks, and much of it could end up in a sea turtle or sea bird’s stomach, or in the Pacific gyre. Picking up garbage on the beach is an easy way to help the oceans.

Extra credit: Take pictures of your clean-up on your iPhone and post them to Instagram. Make sure to tag your photos #ocean and check www.oceana.org/heroes to see what other ocean heroes are up to this summer.

Double extra credit: While you’re cleaning up, support Oceana’s cause by wearing Nautica’s World Oceans Day t-shirt, made from 100 percent organic cotton. The proceeds will benefit our work to protect and restore the world’s oceans.

2. Eat sustainable seafood.

Use the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch guide at the seafood counter or restaurant to make smart and sustainable seafood choices.

Extra credit: Check out our sustainable seafood guides on Foodspotting. The next time you’re eating fish at a restaurant, share pictures from your smart phone on Foodspotting and let others know where they should (and shouldn’t!) go for seafood.

Double extra credit: Check out “For Cod and Country,” a guide to casual, sustainable cuisine by acclaimed Washington DC chef and National Geographic Fellow Barton Seaver.

3. Reuse and recycle.

Take a hint from junior ocean hero finalist Wyatt Workman and don’t be a trash monster – reuse as much as possible, and when you can’t, recycle.

Extra credit: Nix bottled water and get the Oceana water bottle from Nautica. (I have one and it’s the best water bottle I’ve ever owned, hands down.)

Double extra credit: Check out sunglasses from Revo’s Eco Collection; they’re made from Revo Re-Use™, a frame material made from 100 percent recycled pre-consumer polymer resins.

Have you taken the pledge yet? Don’t forget to share it on Facebook and Twitter. Got any other ideas for how to make a difference for the oceans this summer? Let us know in the comments. And thanks to the hundreds of you who have already pledged!


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Announcing the 2011 Ocean Heroes

peter wallerstein

Peter Wallerstein (left) releases a sea lion back into the wild.

Happy World Oceans Day, everyone!

Whether you’re on the coast today or not, we hope you pause to recognize the beauty and bounty of the oceans. Starting today, we're asking all of you to take a pledge to protect the world's oceans -- but more on that later.

And now to the juicy stuff: this year’s Ocean Heroes!

More than 500 ocean activists were nominated, 12 were selected as finalists, and more than 12,000 of you voted. The results? This year’s adult ocean hero is Peter Wallerstein and the junior ocean hero is Sophi Bromenshenkel!

Peter Wallerstein is the program director at Marine Animal Rescue, a project of Friends of Animals, where he has spent the last 25 years rescuing marine mammal in Los Angeles County. He has personally rescued 3,000 marine mammals throughout his career, and also established a team of professional responders that humanely rescues hundreds of animals a year, including whales, dolphins, sea lions and seabirds.

Fittingly, Peter was out helping a stranded California sea lion when I called to give him the good news.


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Join Us for Hands Across the Sand on June 25!

Remember Hands Across the Sand, last year’s explosively popular international demonstration against offshore drilling and for clean energy? The second annual event will take place on June 25 at noon local time all over the world, and Oceana is playing a central role.

Last year’s HANDS brought more than 100,000 people to beaches and parks to join hands for fifteen minutes in a display of solidarity.

Instead of passing laws limiting offshore drilling or raising the liability cap in the event of another major spill, Congress is going in the opposite direction and voting for more offshore drilling, including a major expansion to the East Coast.

Bills being considered now would actually make drilling even less safe than it was before the spill. This fact, along with increasing popular demand for renewable energies, promises a large showing of ocean-lovers to stand up for what’s right.

We’re drawing a metaphorical line in the sand against offshore drilling, will you join us? Check out the details or sign up to organize an event in your community at www.handsacrossthesand.com.

Matt Dundas is a campaign manager at Oceana; he serves on the National Advisory Council for HANDS and attended the 2010 event outside the White House.


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Ocean Hero Finalists: Nancy Caruso

nancy caruso.

Nancy Caruso.

This is the second in a series of posts about this year’s Ocean Hero finalists.

Today’s featured finalist is Nancy Caruso, who was selected for her work to protect giant kelp forests in California. Nancy was inspired to become a marine biologist at age 10, and she has been involved in ocean conservation ever since.

After working on the Orange County Giant Kelp Restoration Project, Nancy started her own non-profit organization, Get Inspired!, which teaches students to grow giant kelp in classroom nurseries. Over the last nine years, Nancy has taught 4000 students to grow giant kelp, which is then planted in the ocean by the 250 volunteer scuba divers that she trained. In addition, this year Nancy started the only program in California to restock green abalone and white sea bass, also in classroom nurseries.

In 2010 Nancy started Kelpfest!, an annual festival with a mission to celebrate giant kelp forests. Thousands turned out in April for the second annual event in Laguna Beach, which included live music, a live underwater broadcast from the kelp forest just offshore, and a scale model of a kelp forest for people to walk through.


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