The Beacon

Blog Tags: Oil Spill

CEO NOTE: Chilean Oil Spill Harms Local Wildlife, Fishing Communities

A sizeable oil spill occurred in Quintero Bay, Chile

Oiled seawater near the Monobuoy Terminal in Chile. (Photo: Oceana / Claudio Almarza)

Nearly a month ago I heard some troublesome news from my Oceana colleagues in Chile: A sizeable oil spill had occurred in Quintero Bay, harming local marine life and jeopardizing the local fishing communities.


Continue reading...

Arctic Oil and Gas Lease Sale Moves Forward Despite Waning Interest from Industry Groups

Polar bears would be affected by Arctic drilling

Polar bears and other majestic marine mammals could be greatly affected by an oil spill in the Arctic Ocean. Click here to join Oceana in asking the Obama Administration to take the Arctic Ocean off the table for the 2017-2022 OCS Lease Sale program. (Photo: Alan D. Wilson [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons)

There’s no question that drilling for oil in Arctic waters is risky business. Twenty five years after the Exxon Valdez tanker hit a reef in 1989, causing the second largest oil spill in U.S. history, wildlife and economies in Alaska’s Prince William Sound are still recovering. And in 2012, as part of an attempt at offshore oil exploration activity in Alaska’s Beaufort and Chukchi seas, Shell’s Kulluk oil drilling rig ran aground near Kodiak Island.


Continue reading...

Eleven Florida Lawmakers Urge President Obama to Reconsider Approval for Seismic Airgun Testing

Florida Lawmakers disapprove of Obama's decision to allow seismic airgun testing

A critically endangered North Atlantic right whale and a pod off bottlenose dolphins off the coast of Florida. (Photo:FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute / Flickr Creative Commons)

When the Obama Administration came out in support oil and gas exploration off the Atlantic Coast last Friday, they caused quite the reaction among lawmakers, environmentalists, and citizens along the East Coast. Immediately after releasing their Record of Decision (ROD) approving seismic airgun blasting in the Atlantic, all Democratic members of Florida’s congressional delegation, including Senator Bill Nelson, submitted a letter to President Obama expressing their disapproval of his decision and reiterating their opposition to any blasting for oil and gas off their coast. 


Continue reading...

Ocean News: Green Sea Turtle Makes Longest Migration Ever Recorded, Small Oil Spill Found off of Italy, and More

A green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas)

A green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas). (Photo: Oceana / Eduardo Sorensen)

- In areas where overfishing is common and observers are few and far between, drones could be a significant resource in helping to tackle illegal fishing. This June, the Wildlife Conservation Society, Belize Drones, and Belize’s fisheries department launched a program that may soon have drones flying over Belize’s Glover Reef. National Geographic


Continue reading...

Yet Another Oil Spill… When is Enough?

(Photo: Waterkeeper Alliance Inc)

We all know that drilling for oil is risky business. But the potential for catastrophe does not stop once crude oil is brought to the surface. Yesterday, a freight train owned by CSX derailed in downtown Lynchburg, VA and spilled crude oil into the James River, causing major environmental damage.


Continue reading...

Galveston Still Hurting Weeks after Spill

(Photo: Coast Guard News)

The aftermath of the March 22, 2014 oil spill in Galveston, Texas has revealed some shocking truths about the oil and gas industry and how it can devastate communities. For starters, Galveston averages nearly one spill each dayAdditionally, the bay has lost more than 35,000 acres of coastal marshes from groundwater pumping. It is a wonder that coastal citizens allow such destruction to take place, especially when considering that Galveston is in the heart of Texas’s fishing industry.


Continue reading...

25 Years Later: Why Alaska Can’t Afford Another Exxon Valdez

(Photo: Oceana)

This story appeared as an editorial on the Huffington Post, authored by Susan Murray, Oceana VP for the Pacific, and Dr. Jeffrey Short.

25 Years Later: Why Alaska Can’t Afford another Exxon Valdez
By Jeffrey Short and Susan Murray


Continue reading...

An Eventful April for Oceana's Climate and Energy Team

Mock oil spills like this one were staged around the country in April to demonstrate disastrous effects of oil drilling on the oceans. Photo: Sarah Schwimmer

Oceana’s climate and energy campaign had an eventful April. In our ongoing effort to stop East Coast offshore drilling before it starts, we’ve been working hard to prevent the oil industry from taking the first step toward drilling: seismic airguns to explore for oil.

The specifics of seismic airgun testing are worth understanding if only because the oil industry seems to be counting on Americans’ lack of knowledge about this highly specific technology in order to get a foothold in some ocean areas that have been protected from drilling since the Reagan administration.


Continue reading...

Exxon Valdez Survivor, Kenai the Otter, Dies

Camera-friendly Kenai ©Shedd Aquarium

Kenai, one of the last two plucky sea otters who survived the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, died on Tuesday at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium. When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground on a reef in Prince William Sound off of Alaska it unloaded 10.8 million gallons of crude oil into the sensitive ecosystem, blanketing 1,300 miles of coastline in viscous sludge. The results were catastrophic. 2,800 sea otters were killed by the spill, including Kenai’s mother. But Kenai, who fit in the palm of her rescuer’s hand at the time, survived more than just an oil spill. As the Associated Press article about her notes, the animal’s longevity offered a window into otter biology:

"In her later years, she provided much information to scientists about geriatric sea otters. Kenai suffered a stroke, underwent ovarian cyst surgery and needed a root canal. She lived to age 23 1/2, while the typical life span of a sea otter is between 15 and 18 years."

That leaves 24 year-old Homer, of the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium in Tacoma, Washington as the lone surviving otter from the disaster.

Apart from otters, the spill killed 300 harbor seals, 900 bald eagles and 250,000 seabirds. Three species of cormorant, the common loon, the harbor seal, the harlequin duck, the pacific herring and the pigeon guillemot have still not fully recovered. But the spill had consequences for more than just Alaskan wildlife. Four humans died during cleanup efforts and the spill cost more than $300 million to Alaska’s commercial fishing industry.

While the Valdez disaster was more than 20 years ago the Deepwater Horizon spill reminds us even with all the advantages of modern 21st century technology, whether during drilling or shipping, oil spills are unavoidable. But as Kenai reminds us, if given a chance, nature is amazingly tenacious and resilient.


Continue reading...

Shell Halts Offshore Oil Drilling in Arctic for 2012

©Wikimedia Commons

After a disastrous few weeks that saw drilling shut down in the Arctic due to unpredictable ice floes, and then the failure of its oil containment dome during testing, Shell has decided to scale back plans for drilling in the Chukchi Sea North of Alaska this season. Instead it will drill only “top holes” rather than all the way down into oil-bearing zones.

Oceana is relieved by the development which only points to the inherent difficulty, and danger, of drilling for oil in such an inhospitable environment:

“Today Shell announced yet another last minute change of plans for this summer’s drilling season due to new problems with its oil spill containment equipment,” said Oceana Senior Pacific Director Susan Murray. “Oceana is just glad this didn’t happen during a real oil spill.  This series of blunders inspires anything but confidence in the oil industry’s ability to safely drill in the Arctic.  Shell’s repeated backtracking, last minute requests for permit and plan changes, and their inability to successfully complete preparations has resulted in mishaps that brings to mind the keystone cops rather than a company that is prepared and ready to work safely . . . If Shell has proved one thing this summer it is that the oil industry is not ready to drill in the Arctic.”

Besides failing tests on its oil containment dome and its ability to contain an oil spill, Shell also has had trouble this summer anchoring its drillship, the Noble Discoverer, and has been unable to upgrade its oil spill recovery barge, a formerly derelict ship called the Arctic Challenger, to Coast Guard standards.


Continue reading...

Browse by Date