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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

From Reuters UK today:

The oil spill poses a large threat to the Kemp's Ridley population which makes its home in the Gulf.

"This is a major blow to that population," said Todd Steiner, executive director of the California-based Turtle Restoration Project, said. "Here you have a situation where the adults, hatchlings and juveniles are all in the Gulf."


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

From CNN.com today:

Oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill may have settled to the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico further east than previously suspected and at levels toxic to marine life, researchers reported Monday.

Initial findings from a new survey of the Gulf conclude that dispersants may have sent the oil to the ocean floor, where it has turned up at the bottom of an undersea canyon within 40 miles of the Florida Panhandle. Plankton and other organisms showed a "strong toxic response" to the crude, according to researchers from the University of South Florida.

"The dispersant is moving the oil down out of the surface and into the deeper waters, where it can affect phytoplankton and other marine life," said John Paul, a marine microbiologist at USF.


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

From NPR.org today:

At the Gulf State Park Pier on the Alabama coast, ranger William Key notices that the waves crashing ashore are brownish, not their usual emerald green hue.

Key says the storm that came through the Gulf of Mexico last week churned up the water, and what was lurking below the surface was "a lot of silt, mud and oil. There's no two ways about it."

Key says people have wondered what would happen if a hurricane strikes while there's still oil in the Gulf.

"Well, we saw what happens just a couple of days ago, and that wasn't even a hurricane," he says. "We got high winds, high surf and it stirred up the oil that was on the bottom."


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

From CNN.com on Monday:

"We can see the beaches; we can see the dead animals; we can get a count on turtles and whales and all this stuff -- and all of that is eye-level observation," said [Ed] Overton, a professor emeritus at Louisiana State University and a veteran of oil-spill science.

"What we don't know is what damage is done ... to little creatures down below the surface -- or just at the surface -- that we never see."


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

On migratory birds from Tuesday's Chicago Tribune:

"We're pretty worried about the fate of waterfowl, wading birds and shorebirds" that have long wintered in the Gulf's protected marshes, said Tim Yager, manager of the McGregor District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge.

Yager said there are two concerns -- that remnant oil from the recently capped BP oil spill will coat the birds' feathers or that they will eat fish and other aquatic animals contaminated by oil.


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

Today’s Oil Spill Quote of the Day features Elizabeth Griffin Wilson, one of our very own scientists:

 From yesterday’s Guardian:

Some 1,020 sea turtles were caught up in the spill, according to figures (pdf) today – an ominous number for an endangered species. Wildlife officials collected 177 sea turtles last week – more than in the first two months of the spill and a sizeable share of the 1,020 captured since the spill began more than three months ago. Some 517 of that total number were dead and 440 were covered in oil, according to figures maintained the Deepwater Horizon response team.


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

From today's Washington Post:

The government said last week that three-quarters of the spilled oil has been removed or naturally dissipated from the water. But the crab larvae discovery was an ominous sign that crude had already infiltrated the Gulf's vast food web - and could affect it for years to come.

"It would suggest the oil has reached a position where it can start moving up the food chain instead of just hanging in the water," said Bob Thomas, a biologist at Loyola University in New Orleans. "Something likely will eat those oiled larvae ... and then that animal will be eaten by something bigger and so on."

Tiny creatures might take in such low amounts of oil that they could survive, Thomas said. But those at the top of the chain, such as dolphins and tuna, could get fatal "megadoses."


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

From NPR.com today:

"It's actually round two of psychological trauma for these communities, who also in the back of their minds are already worried about hurricanes this season," said [president of the Children’s Health Fund, Dr. Irwin] Redlener, who plans to bring doctors to the Gulf in the next few weeks to provide physical and mental care for the children who are suffering nightmares or other stress, or who have rashes, breathing problems or other physical effects from the spill.


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

From yesterday's New York Times:

Federal scientists and coastal residents agree in at least one respect: that the long-term effects of the spill are unknown, and that it is too early to make any conclusions about the true scale of the damage. That uncertainty leads to perhaps the most potent source of skepticism: a deep anxiety about the region’s economic future.


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Oil Spill Fact of the Day

From yesterday’s Washington Post:

BP's well was gushing faster than expected, government experts said. The latest estimate pegs original "flow rate" at 62,000 barrels a day (2.6 million gallons), higher than the last estimate of 35,000 to 60,000 barrels. As the reservoir was depleted, the rate was reduced to 53,000 barrels a day. They calculated the total oil coming from the blown-out well at 4.9 million barrels, more than 18 times the amount of oil that was spilled during the Exxon Valdez disaster.


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