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Blog Tags: Seahorses

Happy Halloween! Meet the Ocean Animals in Costume All Year (Photos)

Ocean animals are in costume all year

Pygmy seahorses, which can change their skin color to blend in with their surroundings. (Photo: Tom Gruber / Flickr Creative Commons)

Happy Halloween, ocean lovers! Today, many people are delighting in the one day of the year where they can dress up to be any figure that these please. But in the vast ocean, many species are in costume all year—dazzling bright photophores to trick prey, or changing their skin tone to blend in with their environments. The deep-sea anglerfish, for example, flashes it lure covered in light-producing cells to attract and trick prey in the cold, dark waters, while species like the firefly squid emits bioluminescent ink to also confuse predators.


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Ocean News: National Aquarium Launches Sustainable Seafood Program, Seahorses Can Growl, and More

Pacific seahorse (Hippocampus ingens) around the Galapagos Islands

Pacific seahorse (Hippocampus ingens) around the Galapagos Islands. (Photo: Flickr Creative Commons / Peter Liu Photography)

- The National Aquarium launched a Sustainable Seafood Program earlier this week. The program will enhance seafood education, foster links between local fishermen and local markets, and improve opportunities for restaurants to serve local seafood. The Baltimore Sun


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Marine Monday: Leafy Seadragon

leafy seadragon

A leafy seadragon. [Image via Wikimedia Commons]

Underwater masters of disguise, leafy seadragons take their name from their greenish coloring and their many appendages that look like seaweed.

They belong to a group of fish closely related to seahorses and are found exclusively along the southern coast of Australia. Like their more famous cousins, seadragons have armor-like exoskeletons, and fertilized eggs are tended by the male. But seadragons have longer snouts than seahorses and cannot use their tail to grasp onto their surroundings.

Leafy seadragons are weak swimmers, so they avoid predators by blending in with their surroundings. They also move with the waves just like seaweed, which makes them even more difficult to spot.

Scientists aren’t sure how well leafy seadragons are doing these days. Unlike seahorses, they are not sought after by the traditional Chinese medicine market. There are anecdotal reports of seadragons accidentally caught by fishermen, but no estimates of how many fish this affects.

The more pressing concern is habitat loss: seadragons live in only a small strip of Australian waters, and their habitat is being destroyed by sewage from nearby cities. On the other hand, local governments have enacted several protection measures, and leafy seadragons, which are an important ecotourism draw, are the official fish of South Australia.

Learn more about the leafy seadragon and other fascinating animals at Oceana’s marine encyclopedia.


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