The Beacon

Blog Tags: Wasted Catch

Federal Government Takes Steps to Better Monitor Bycatch in Southeast and Gulf Fisheries

NMFS is taking steps to improve bycatch reporting

A sea turtle accidentally hooked on a longline. NMFS announced it will work to better its bycatch counting practices in the Gulf and Southeast fisheries. (Photo: Oceana / Mar Mas)

Following Oceana’s recommendation to develop a bycatch—the incidental take of marine mammals, sea turtles, and other marine life in fisheries—reporting plan last month, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced last week that it will be taking steps to more accurately analyze the amount and type of wasted catch in Gulf of Mexico and Southeast region fisheries.


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Oceana Takes Action to Reduce Wasted Catch in East Coast Gillnet Fisheries

Ocean submitted a letter to reduce gillnet bycatch

An illegal Moroccan drift gillnet boat hauls in a sea turtle. (Photo: Oceana / Jesus Renedo)

Last month, Oceana submitted a proposal aimed at reducing the amount of wasted catch in New England and Mid-Atlantic gillnet fisheries, which throw away 16 percent of their total catch every year. The Northeast gillnet fisheries were identified in Oceana’s Wasted Catch report as one of the nine most wasteful fisheries in the United States as a result of their bycatch.


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Oceana Magazine: Wasted Catch

Oceana's Wasted Catch report outlined the dirtiest fisheries for bycatch

A loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) caught on a longline. (Photo: Oceana / Mar Mas)

Earlier this year, Oceana released a new report, “Wasted Catch,” that looked at the dirtiest fisheries in the United States for bycatch, and found that some U.S. fisheries discard more than half of everything they catch. This feature takes a close look at these fisheries and other issues surrounding bycatch.


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