MollyH's blog

Oil Spill Quote of the Day

Posted Tue, Aug 3, 2010 by MollyH to gulf oil spill, oil flow rate, oil spill quote of the day

From yesterday’s New York Times, which confirmed that the BP spill is by far the world’s largest accidental release of oil into the ocean:

“We’ve never had a spill of this magnitude in the deep ocean,” said Ian R. MacDonald, a professor of oceanography at Florida State University.

“These things reverberate through the ecosystem,” he said. “It is an ecological echo chamber, and I think we’ll be hearing the echoes of this, ecologically, for the rest of my life.”


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Fact of the Day: Scalloped Hammerhead Shark

Posted Mon, Aug 2, 2010 by MollyH to discovery shark week, Fact of the Day, hammerhead sharks, scalloped hammerhead sharks, shark week, sharks

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark (credit: Barry Peters)

Shark Week started last night! (And how great was ‘Ultimate Air Jaws?!”)

Oceana is a partner in Shark Week this year, and it’s my favorite week of the year, so I’m going to keep the celebration going with daily shark facts!

The scalloped hammerhead shark is just one of the many species of hammerhead shark, all of which have the characteristic t-shaped head.


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

Posted Mon, Aug 2, 2010 by MollyH to Adm. Thad Allen, gulf oil spill, Macondo, oil spill quote of the day, static kill

Here is an explanation of BP’s “static kill” tactic being used to close the well from today’s Washington Post:

The "static kill" is part of a double whammy of mud and cement that would hit the runaway Macondo well high and low in quick succession. The static kill starts at the top, firing the mud and possibly cement into the blowout preventer that sits on the wellhead.

That effort, which would take a day or two, would be followed in another five to seven days by the start of the more laborious "bottom kill," in which mud and cement will be injected into Macondo through a relief well that engineers began drilling at the beginning of May.


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Fact of the Day: Ghost Crab

Posted Thu, Jul 29, 2010 by MollyH to crabs, Fact of the Day, ghost crab

Ghost Crab (credit: Hans Hillewaert)

Ghost crabs are named for their sandy coloring, which allows them to blend right into their surroundings. These crabs eat at night and burrow during the day in burrows up to three feet deep. 

Ghost crabs can move quickly in any direction and their large eyes can see 360 degrees. Male ghost crabs participate in ritualistic displays to settle disputes and rarely physically combat. 

Go to Oceana.org/Explore for more fun animal info and check back tomorrow for a shark-filled FOTD!


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

Posted Thu, Jul 29, 2010 by MollyH to gulf oil spill, oil spill quote of the day

From today's Washington Post:

"That stuff's somewhere," said James H. Cowan Jr., a professor at Louisiana State University. His research has shown concentrations of oil still floating miles from the wellhead. "It's going to be with us for a while. I'm worried about some habitats being exposed chronically to low concentrations of toxins. . . . If the water's contaminated, the animals are going to be contaminated."


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Fact of the Day: Christmas Tree Worm

Posted Wed, Jul 28, 2010 by MollyH to christmas tree worm, corals, Fact of the Day, filter feeders

Christmas Tree Worms (credit: Nick Hobgood)

The subject of today’s FOTD is the Christmas tree worm, or spirobranchus giganteus for those of you who prefer the scientific name. 

Christmas tree worms are embedded in the surface of corals by the calcareous, shell-like tubes in which they live.  They have two beautiful, feathery spirals (which look like little Christmas trees) that extend into the water column and are used for filter-feeding and breathing. At the slightest disturbance, the Christmas tree worm retracts into its tube in the coral for safety. 

My favorite thing about these worms is their variety of vibrant colors and patterns- check it out!

See you tomorrow for another random FOTD! And if you’re like me and you just can’t wait for more, go to Oceana.org/Explore.   


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

Posted Wed, Jul 28, 2010 by MollyH to gulf oil spill, oil spill clean-up, quote of the day

From today’s Washington Post:

"The sheer volume of oil that's out there has to mean there are some pretty significant impacts," [NOAA director Jane Lubchenco] said. "What we have yet to determine is the full impact the oil will have not just on the shoreline, not just on wildlife, but beneath the surface."


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Fact of the Day: Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle

Posted Tue, Jul 27, 2010 by MollyH to get turtles off the hook, impacts of oil on sea turtles in the gulf, kemp's ridley sea turtle, nesting sea turtles, sea turtle

Kemp’s ridley sea turtles, the smallest species of sea turtle,  participate in one of the most intriguing nesting rituals, called arribadas, meaning “arrivals” in Spanish. During an arribada, huge numbers of female Kemp’s ridleys waddle up beaches simultaneously to lay their eggs. 

These already threatened sea turtles are facing further obstacles from the Gulf oil spill. If you haven’t already done so, please sign the petition to stop offshore drilling to help protect these turtles and other crucial wildlife in the future. 

Come back tomorrow for another FOTD, browse Oceana.org/Explore for more animal facts, and check out Oceana.org/TurtlesOffTheHook for more info about how to help save sea turtles. 


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Oil Spill Quote of the Day

Posted Tue, Jul 27, 2010 by MollyH to gulf oil spill, marsh, noaa, oil in marshes, quote of the day

From CNN today:

"It's obvious what's going on at the surface. The big issue is what's trapped in the marsh," [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s chief fisheries scientist Steve] Murawski said.


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