Andy Sharpless's blog

CEO Note: Bipartisan Support for the Oceans

Posted Mon, Oct 7, 2013 by Andy Sharpless to andrew sharpless, ceo andy sharpless, ceo note, partners award gala, seachange summer party

(Photo: Oceana)

We live in a world increasingly divided and governed by partisanship. At times, it can be frustrating for those of us who want to make a difference.

That is why I am proud to let you know about the Oceana’s relationship with two remarkable leaders from different sides of the aisle, both united in their desire to save our oceans: Hillary Rodham Clinton and James Connaughton.


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CEO Note: 100,000 Against Seismic Blasts

Posted Mon, Sep 30, 2013 by Andy Sharpless to andrew sharpless, andy sharpless, atlantic seismic testing, ceo note, seismic airgun testing

Seismic airguns could injure or kill dolphins along the Atlantic coast. (Photo: Bryan) 

I have more great news to share with you about Oceana’s campaign to halt the use of deadly seismic airguns on our Atlantic coast. On September 6, Oceana delivered more than 100,000 petitions to Tommy Beaudreau, director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. Those petitions urge the government to stop the proposed use of seismic airguns, which the energy industry wants to use to search more than 300,000 square miles of the Atlantic for buried oil and gas deposits.


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CEO Note: The Perfect Protein in the News

Posted Mon, Sep 9, 2013 by Andy Sharpless to andrew sharpless, andy sharpless, ceo, ceo note, perfect protein, the perfect protein

Fresh seafood is the key to feeding the world's growing population. (Photo: Oceana)

Oceana’s new book, The Perfect Protein is available for sale at your local book store and online. Authored by myself and Suzannah Evans, with a foreword by Bill Clinton, this book explores the connections between ocean conservation and food security.

The new ideas presented in The Perfect Protein are gathering attention, and I want to share some of the coverage it received in the press and digital media:


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CEO Note: Oceana Victory -- Decision on Atlantic Seismic Testing is Delayed

Posted Fri, Aug 23, 2013 by Andy Sharpless to andrew sharpless, andy sharpless, ceo, ceo note, seismic airgun testing

If permitted, seismic airgun testing in the Atlantic could injure or kill some of the last North Atlantic right whales remaining on earth. l Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

It’s not often that a government delay is cause for celebration, but this time the oceans caught a break. After campaigning by Oceana and our allies, the Department of the Interior decided to postpone their decision on whether to allow seismic airgun use off the Atlantic coast until next March. 

This is the third time Oceana has successfully delayed the decision, allowing us the chance to build opposition and to urge more lawmakers to protect marine mammals by opposing testing. It also gives the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration time to update its outdated standards for the level of noise that is harmful to sea life.


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Oceana CEO Andy Sharpless Discusses His New Book, The Perfect Protein

Posted Wed, May 22, 2013 by Andy Sharpless to andy sharpless, book, ceo, feed the world, new book, perfect protein, rodale, save the oceans, STOFTW, the perfect protein

Nine billion of us are estimated to be on the planet by 2050, and the demand for food will increase by 70 percent above today’s levels. If land and fresh water are already under strain, how in the world are we going to feed a population that grows by 220,000 mouths every day? Well, the ocean conservation measures you champion as an Oceana supporter can, believe it or not, help make a huge difference. You can find out how in my new book, The Perfect Protein, which can be pre-ordered now from Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Indiebound.


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CEO Note: Maryland Takes the Lead

Posted Mon, Apr 15, 2013 by Andy Sharpless to ceo note, maryland, offshore wind, shark finning

Oceana CEO Andy Sharpless

If you’re a Marylander like me, this is a time to be proud. The Old Line State has stepped forward, making ocean conservation a priority and providing an example that other states would be wise to follow.

First, Maryland became a leader in developing offshore wind energy by passing The Maryland Offshore Wind Energy Act of 2013, which was signed into law by Governor Martin O’Malley this week. The measure will help spur the development of at least 200 megawatts of renewable energy off Maryland’s coast – enough to power about 200,000 homes.

While wind turbines already dot Europe’s coast, the United States has yet to construct a single offshore wind farm. Maryland’s legislation marks an important milestone on this country’s path to a clean ocean energy future.

This victory was made possible by the tireless advocacy of Oceana and a diverse coalition of environmental, faith, business and community groups, all of which recognized the need to transition to this clean and abundant form of energy, and away from fossil fuels. Special thanks to Chesapeake Climate Action Network, National Wildlife Federation, Maryland League of Conservation Voters, Maryland Sierra Club and Environment Maryland for helping to pressure lawmakers to take this first step towards a greener energy portfolio for the state.

Second, both the Maryland House and Senate passed a bill to prohibit the sale and trade of shark fins. Pending the signature of the Governor, Maryland will become the first state on the East Coast to adopt such a ban. Approximately 100 million sharks are killed each year, primarily to support the demand for shark fin soup. While shark finning is banned in the U.S, this brutal practice—which involves slicing the fins off a live shark and then dumping it back in the water where it is left to die—is still occurring around the world.  By stopping the shark fin trade in state, Maryland can help protect sharks worldwide.

So congratulations Maryland, but remember, there’s a lot of work still left to do to protect our oceans. As for the rest of the states, what are you waiting for?


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CEO Note: Shell Retreats on Arctic Drilling

Posted Thu, Feb 28, 2013 by Andy Sharpless to Kulluk, offshore drilling, shell

Arctic waters off-limits for Shell. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

I have some terrific news to report: Shell announced yesterday that it will suspend attempts to drill for oil in the U.S. Arctic Ocean. 

This announcement comes as a huge relief after Shell’s dangerous string of mishaps in the Arctic in the past year. In late December, the company’s drill rig, the Kulluk, broke away from its tow vessel in rough seas, and ran aground on New Year’s Eve off of Kodiak Island in an area that is home to endangered Steller sea lions, threatened southwest sea otters, and salmon. 

Fortunately, the Coast Guard was able to rescue the crew of the Kulluk, and salvage crews were able to pull the vessel off the rocks without significant ecological harm. But the Kulluk incident capped off a year of missteps, and made it clear that Shell is not prepared to drill in the Arctic.

As Oceana’s Mike LeVine points out, “Shell currently faces two disabled vessels, two pending Coast Guard investigations, two notices of violation of the Clean Air Act, and an ongoing ‘assessment’ by the Department of the Interior.  Fundamentally, both the company and the government agencies charged with making decisions about our ocean resources are faced with a crisis of confidence.  The decisions to allow Shell to operate in the Arctic Ocean clearly were premature.” 

This week, the civil trial began in New Orleans against BP and its partners in the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. During the opening statements, an attorney for the Justice Department said, "The evidence will show that BP put profits above people, profits before safety and profits before the environment.”

The attorney’s statement could easily describe Shell’s behavior in 2012, except that the company was forced, by its own failures, to stop before real disaster struck. We are extremely lucky to have avoided catastrophe considering the unforgiving conditions in Alaskan waters and the impossibility of cleaning up a spill.

Kudos to Oceana’s team and our allies in Alaska for their persistent campaign work to achieve this victory.

Andy Sharpless is the CEO of Oceana


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Oceana CEO: A Shocking Report on Your Seafood

Posted Thu, Feb 21, 2013 by Andy Sharpless to Austin, boston, california, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Kansas City, national seafood fraud report, New York, new york city, Portland, Seattle, south florida, Washington D.C.

Do you know what you're serving? Photo © Oceana

 

Do you know what you are serving your family tonight? If it’s fish there’s a good chance that you don’t.

Today Oceana unveiled its landmark national seafood fraud report, one of the largest of its kind and one that should make consumers sit up and demand change.

Over the past several years Oceana tested 1,215 fish samples from 674 retail outlets in 21 states. DNA testing confirmed that fully one-third of this seafood was mislabeled—that is, what we ordered wasn’t what we got.

No matter where you live, seafood fraud is likely to be an issue. But if you live in Austin, Houston or Boston, it is especially widespread. According to our investigation, almost half of the fish tested in these cities was mislabeled.  In Southern California the problem was even worse, with mislabeled fish accounting for more than half (52%) of the seafood we tested! Elsewhere, rates of mislabeling were found to be 39 percent in New York City, 38 percent in Northern California and South Florida, 36 percent in Denver, 35 percent in Kansas City, 32 percent in Chicago, 26 percent in Washington, D.C., 21 percent in Portland and 18 percent in Seattle. Nationwide, sushi restaurants mislabeled their fish 74 percent of the time.

As one of our scientists told me, these findings are disturbing—and they’re disturbing for a few reasons. Not only can seafood fraud rip you off by making you pay more for less expensive fish but it can actually be bad for your health. Our scientists found that some fish that had landed a spot on the FDA’s “DO NOT EAT” list for sensitive groups such as pregnant women and children because of its high mercury content was nonetheless being substituted for safer fish. In New York this meant tilefish disguised as red snapper and halibut, while in South Florida king mackerel became grouper. Elsewhere escolar, an oily fish that is known for its purgative effects in some consumers, was substituted 84% of the time for white tuna

If that wasn’t bad enough, mislabeling can be harmful to the oceans as well. By disguising one species as another, it can be nearly impossible for consumers to make responsible decisions to avoid eating overfished species.

So what can you do about it? Right now the United States imports more than 90 percent of the seafood it consumes, but the FDA inspects less than one percent of that seafood specifically for fraud. Obviously this needs to change and we need to call upon our lawmakers to ensure full traceability for all seafood sold in the country. Oceana is hard at work behind the scenes to make this happen. In the meantime, if you don’t want to be duped by seafood fraud you can start by asking where and how your seafood was caught, be wary of fish that seems cheaper than it should and, when possible, buy fish whole.

Seafood is one of the healthiest sources of protein on the planet and should be a part of any healthy diet, but we need to know that what we’re buying is what the label says it is—for the good of our health, our wallets and our oceans.

Andy Sharpless is the CEO of Oceana


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Oceana CEO: Historic win for Europe's Fisheries

Posted Thu, Feb 7, 2013 by Andy Sharpless to Common Fisheries Policy, EU, European parliament

Bottom trawlers embark from Roses, Spain in Catalonia. ©Oceana/Juan Cuetos

I just received some tremendous news out of Europe.

After almost two years of debate, the European Parliament has voted to overhaul the management of its fisheries, the fifth largest in the world.  

The European fleet includes tens of thousands of vessels and catches 4.5 percent of the total world catch by weight, so the fact that Europe is on its way to becoming a leader in fisheries reform is incredibly good news for our oceans.

The vote in the Parliament makes it increasingly likely that a dramatic reform of Europe’s overarching fishing policy, the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), will become law. The new CFP will ensure that fish stocks are caught at sustainable levels, known as the Maximum Sustainable Yield, by 2015. It will also, remarkably, put an end to the wasteful practice of discards, put Europe on a path to low-impact fishing, and set up a network of fish stock recovery areas.

Time and time again, we’ve seen that doing these three things – implementing science-based quotas, protecting habitat and limiting bycatch – can dramatically increase the amount of fish in the water.

Here are some of the key amendments included in the comprehensive reform policy:

This enormous win wouldn’t have been possible without the hard work of Oceana and other ocean conservation advocates. Oceana and our allies have been campaigning for this reform for years in the European Union, one of the most overfished regions in the world. As I reported to you several weeks ago, the majority of the EU’s fish stocks that have been scientifically-assessed have been found to be overfished, with some species nearing extinction.

The EU Parliament will soon begin negotiations with the Council of Fisheries ministers to reach a final agreement on the details of the reform by June.

One thing is for sure already – 2013 is off to a promising start for the oceans.

Andy Sharpless is the CEO of Oceana


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