Brianna Elliott's blog

Ocean News: Sea Turtle Nesting in Florida Sees Steady Increase, 2014 Could Be Hottest on Record, and More

Posted Tue, Oct 21, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to Arctic Council, Arctic shipping, climate change, deep sea mining, sea turtle nesting

Sea turtle nesting in Florida has seen a steady increase

A leatherback sea turtle hatchling. Sea turtle nesting has increased in Florida in recent years. (Photo: Tim Calver / Oceana)

- New research shows that male bluefin killifish have varying colorations and markings on their fins to signal different messages. Even though most field guides show one fin of the killifish to be blue, researchers found they also came in yellow and red. Science Daily


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Photos, Video: Oceana Wraps Up Canary Islands Expedition after Discovering Vast Biodiversity

Posted Mon, Oct 20, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to canary islands, Canary Islands expedition, oceana expeditions, Ranger, ROV

Oceana in Europe concluded their expedition to the Canary Islands

Diver into a volcanic arch in Roques de la Hoya, El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain, pictured during the Ranger Expedition to the Atlantic Seamounts in September 2014. (Photo: Oceana in Europe / Carlos Minguell)

Oceana in Europe recently concluded their month-long expedition to the Canary Islands, which documented a vast amount of biodiversity around the island of El Hierro. The expedition aimed to map and gather more information about seamounts north of Lanzarote, the easternmost Canary Island, and around Sahara, the southernmost point of the Spanish Exclusive Economic Zone, to help grow the body of knowledge about these areas and advance their protective measures.


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Ocean Roundup: Lionfish Being Fed to Reef Sharks, New Polymer Could Reduce Shark Bycatch, and More

Posted Mon, Oct 20, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to beluga whales, lionfish, offshore drilling, reef sharks, shark bycatch

Lionfish are being fed to reef sharks to help control lionfish numbers

A lionfish. Lionfish are being hand-fed to reef sharks in an effort to control lionfish populations. (Photo: Michael Aston / Flickr Creative Commons)

- New research shows that deep-sea microbes use vitamin B12 to break down toxic chemicals on the seafloor. Scientists that found microbes using this vitamin reduced the toxicity of dangerous polychlorinated biphenyals (PCBs), dioxins, and other dangerous substances. Forbes


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Ocean Roundup: Seafood Fraud Ring Uncovered in Australia, Fish Species Found to Change Skin Color, and More

Posted Fri, Oct 17, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to humpback whales, rockpool goby, sea star wasting syndrome, seafood fraud

Sea star wasting syndrome has not yet hit Alaska

Ochre sea stars in Alaska. Alaska sea stars have yet to be hit with sea star wasting disease. (Photo: David~O / Flickr Creative Commons)

- A 16-foot-long baby humpback whale was released after becoming entangled in a net off Queensland, Australia. Humpback whales are currently migrating back to their feeding grounds in Antarctica. ABC Australia


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Celebrate National Seafood Month with This Sustainable Recipe: Wild Salmon with Spinach

Posted Thu, Oct 16, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to national seafood month, seafood, seafood recipes, sustainable seafood recipes, world food day

Ron Burn's wild salmon and spinach recipe is sustainable

Salmon with spinach. (Photo: Sean T Evans / Flickr Creative Commons)

October is National Seafood Month, a time to raise awareness for sustainable fisheries and celebrate the benefits of seafood in one’s diet.


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On World Food Day, A Look at Six of The Most Commonly Mislabeled Seafood Options

The most commonly mislabeled seafood includes snapper, tuna, and cod

(Photo: Oceana / Jenn Hueting)

When you go to a restaurant and think you’re ordering a white tuna or filet of wild-caught salmon, there’s a good chance the fish on your dinner plate is not what it seems. Numerous studies have uncovered that seafood fraud—the dishonest practice of swapping one type of seafood for another—occurs on a global scale in all steps of the seafood supply chain. Seafood fraud studies have been undertaken in 29 countries and on all continents except Antarctica, and every study have uncovered seafood fraud to some degree.


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Ocean Roundup: Federal Agencies Called Out on Ocean Acidification Inaction, Steller Sea Lions May Have a New Predator, and More

Pacific sleeper sharks may be preying on steller sea lions

Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) pups. New research shows Pacific sleeper sharks may be preying on Steller sea lions. (Photo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife / Flickr Creative Commons)

- The Government Accountability Office has called out federal agencies for not implementing key parts of a 2009 law on ocean acidification, like estimating research costs. Some say that the news is troubling, especially since the federal government plays a key role in addressing ocean acidification. The Hill


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Video: Oceana Makes Plea for Mediterranean Swordfish, Says EU Overlooking Its Decline

A swordfish (Xiphias gladius) caught by a typical vessel for artisanal fishing swordfish with a harpoon in Italy. (Photo: Oceana in Europe / Alessandro Donelli)

Update: October 15, 2014

As the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) gears up to meet this November to discuss the future of highly migratory species like bluefin tuna, swordfish, and sharks, Oceana in Europe is sounding the alarm on the European Union for not taking measurable action to help recover Mediterranean swordfish. Mediterranean swordfish are highly overfished and have declined steeply by 70 percent from 1980s levels, according to assessments taken this year.


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Introducing the Nudibranch: Multicolored Mollusks that Dazzle the Seafloor (Photos)

Nudibranch (Cratena peregrina) feeding on hydrozoan polyps in the Maddalena National Park, Sardinia, Italy. (Photo: Oceana / Carlos Suárez)

You may have heard of nudibranchs before, a group of soft-bodied mollusks that are just as quirky looking as their name suggests. More than 3,000 nudibranch species exist—commonly known as sea slugs—and dot shallow water habitat around the world with their vibrant colors, shapes, and sizes.


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