bottlenose dolphins

Ocean Roundup: UN Sounds Alarm on Mangrove Disappearance, Brazil to Triple Marine Protected Areas, and More

Posted Tue, Sep 30, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to bottlenose dolphins, Brazil MPAs, Chesapeake Bay health, manatees, mangroves

A new UN report warns that mangroves are disappearing

Mangroves in Elbow Reef, Key Largo, Florida. The U.N. has issued a report warning about mangrove disappearance. (Photo: Oceana / Carlos Minguell)

- Brazil is planning to triple its Marine Protected Areas from 5.5 million hectares to over 17.5 million—a project that’s worth more than $18 million. The projected is intended to benefit the 43 million people who live along Brazil’s coast by securing a local food supply, maintaining water quality, and increasing coastal resilience. MercoPress


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Ocean Roundup: Rare Blue Lobster Caught in Maine, Cephalopod Skin Providing Groundwork for New Technology, and More

Posted Wed, Aug 27, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to Antarctic ice sheet, bottlenose dolphins, cephalopods, lobster, whales

Cephalopods have been used in new technology

Common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in Portugal. Cephalopods, like octopuses, have been inspiration for new technology. (Photo:  Oceana / Carlos Minguell)

- New York City may seem like the last place to spot whales, but these cetaceans are making a comeback in the area. This summer, an eco-tourism group has spotted 52 whales alone. CBS News


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Marine Mammal Unusual Mortality Events Get the Spotlight on Capitol Hill

Posted Fri, Jul 18, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to bottlenose dolphins, california sea lions, common dolphins, marine mammal strandings, Prescott grant, UME

Stranded sea lion pup

Stranded sea lion pup. (Photo: Kellan / Flickr Creative Commons)

Earlier this week, marine mammals like California sea lions, common dolphins, and bottlenose dolphins were the focus of one Congressional Briefing. Hosted by the International Fund for Animal Welfare, Congressman Bill Keating of Massachusetts and Congressman Jared Huffman of California, the discussion centered on scientists from The Marine Mammal Center and the Virginia Aquarium and Marine Science Center speaking about unusual levels of marine mammal stranding in 2013, and how funding cuts are deeply affecting their ability to respond.


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Video: Bottlenose Dolphins Surf Australia’s Waves Better than the Pros

Posted Thu, Jun 19, 2014 by Madeleine Simon to bottlenose dolphins, dolphins, surfing dolphins, western australia

Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops)

Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops) (Photo: Oceana)

Bottlenose dolphins off the coast of Western Australia are stealing the spotlight from Aussie surfers, and are proving that humans aren’t the only ones capable of catching that perfect wave.


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Victory! 2nd Coal-Fired Power Plant Defeated in Chile

Posted Mon, Mar 28, 2011 by Emily Fisher to bottlenose dolphins, chile, coal-fired power plant, cruz grande, humboldt penguins, marine reserves, thermoelectric power, victories

sea lions in chile

Sea lions in the waters off northern Chile. © Oceana/Eduardo Sorensen

For the second time in less than a year, Oceana has helped to defeat a coal-fired power plant on the coast of northern Chile. The CAP company announced last week that it was withdrawing its plans to construct the Cruz Grande thermoelectric power plant.

Cruz Grande was slated to be a 300-megawatt thermoelectric power plant in the region of La Higuera in Northern Chile, a few miles from the Choros-Damas and Chañaral island marine reserves, and near the Humboldt Penguin National Reserve, which is home to the world’s largest population of Humboldt penguins. The region also hosts communities of bottlenose dolphins, marine otters and many marine birds and mammals, including blue whales.

These creatures and habitats were at risk from the plant’s emissions, which would have arrived quickly to the reserves. The plant would have used the area’s seawater to cool the plant, discharging it back into the ocean at higher temperatures. Oil spills from ships carrying coal to the plants would seep there in a few hours, and the local currents would retain the pollution within the area. Plus, mercury emissions from the plants would contaminate fish and mollusks like the Chilean abalone, damaging a crucial local industry.


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Expedition Wildlife Spotting, Part 2

Posted Mon, Aug 23, 2010 by Emily Fisher to beaches, bottlenose dolphins, gulf of mexico, oceana gulf expedition, oil, spinner dolphins, spotter plane, whale sharks

On my second attempt to spot whale sharks yesterday, I flew with the effervescent Bonny Schumaker, whose organization On Wings of Care helps protect wildlife and their habitats by helping with search, rescue, rehabilitation and scientific research. Samantha Whitcraft of the non-profit Oceanic Defense also joined us for the flight. We took off from New Orleans and flew about 50 miles south over the Gulf.

Bonny and her 4-seater plane, whom she lovingly refers to as “Bessie,” have years of experience spotting wildlife.  Unfortunately, despite Bonny and Bessie’s best efforts, the conditions yesterday were simply not ideal for finding marine life. Choppy waters and white caps made it a challenge to see much of anything besides oil rigs, oil boom and barrier islands:



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Can You Hear Me Now?

Posted Mon, Apr 27, 2009 by GraceS to bottlenose dolphins, dolphins, SONAR

A recent study conducted at the University of Hawaii provides “sound” evidence that sonar induces temporary deafness in bottlenose dolphins. Many have long blamed man-made noise -- mainly sonar used by the navy -- for mass strandings of whale and dolphin species. Although this study does not provide concrete proof that submarine and warship sonar activity is causing strandings, it does prove definitively that sonar activity can affect cetaceans if they are close enough to the source and exposed over a prolonged period of time. Whales and dolphins use sound for navigation and temporary deafness can leave them disoriented. They are traveling over very large distances and cannot afford to lose their sense of direction. If they were to accidentally swim into a shallow area or be washed ashore, they could rapidly become dehydrated and die.


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The Scanner

Posted Fri, Mar 6, 2009 by Emily Fisher to bottlenose dolphins, dolphins, whales

This week in ocean news, ...A 72 million-year-old sea turtle fossil -- the oldest on record -- was discovered in Mexico. ...A council plans to vote in June on protecting the sea floor from Florida to North Carolina from bottom trawls, bottom longlines and other destructive fishing gear. The 23,000 square miles is thought to encompass the largest deepwater reef system in the world. ...Almost 200 pilot whales and bottlenose dolphins were stranded on a beach in Tasmania, the fourth beaching incident there in recent months. ...The fisher poets (no relation to yours truly) had their annual gathering in Oregon. ...Scientists discovered a carnivorous sea squirt that looks like a desk lamp. ...As the OCYC notes, David de Rothschild is leading a project to build a 60-foot catamaran out of plastic bottles, called Plastiki, which he will sail from California to Australia. ...A Bengal tiger cub and a dolphin made friends. The next Disney Pixar movie, anyone?


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