deepwater horizon disaster

Portraits from the Gulf: George Barisich

George Barisich, a commercial fisherman in Louisiana

George Barisich, a commercial fisherman in Louisiana. (Photo: Oceana / Joshua Prindiville)

April 20 marked the four-year anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. In the process of filming a short film about the aftermath of the spill, “Drill, Spill, Repeat?” Oceana staff met George Barisich, a commercial fisherman in Louisiana. Oceana staff sat down with Barisich to discuss his struggle to regain his heath and make a living from the ocean in the wake of the oil spill. This is the second story in a three-part blog series that highlights the many faces of the Gulf’s recovery. Stay tuned for more.


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Caribbean Fishermen Join Environmentalists to Protest Seismic Airguns

(Photo: Shane K)

In the midst of heated debates along the U.S. Atlantic coast regarding seismic testing, citizens in the Caribbean are waging their own war against energy companies who want to use this technology to search for oil and gas deposits. Seismic airguns have been shown to reduce catch rates, harm marine mammals, and threaten the livelihood of coastal communities.


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Japan Plans to Build Floating Offshore Wind Farm

offshore wind turbine

© Oceana

The Fukushima nuclear disaster, sparked by the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan last March, has led the Japanese government to embrace a safer energy source: offshore wind.

Japan seeks to expand its wind energy capacity and compete with European markets in the brand new field of floating offshore wind technology. The country plans to build a pilot floating wind farm with six 2-Megawatt turbines, and then scale up to 80 floating turbines off the Fukushima coast by 2020.

While offshore wind has begun to be used in Europe, to date, it has been dependent on shallow enough water to stabilize the foundation. There is currently an international race to develop floating offshore wind farms, which are the next big step in offshore wind energy as they will allow for offshore wind development even in deeper water.

Floating offshore wind designs are being field tested in the North Sea and Portugal. (Check out this video describing how one type of floating wind turbine is designed and deployed.)  Floating wind farms consist of large floating structures that support a spinning turbine, the base of which can be tethered to the ocean floor.

It uses a ballast system to transfer water between pillars to keep the platform stable even in very high seas. The floating farms are assembled on land and then can be towed out to sea to be placed in deeper water locations that have stronger and steadier winds. The ability to place offshore wind farms into deeper waters along with their lack of concrete bases and increased mobility reduces their environmental impact while increasing their production of clean energy.

Japan has responded to the Fukushima disaster in the way that the U.S. should respond to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster – by aggressively pursuing safer, more environmentally friendly energy sources that will allow us to phase out the older and more dangerous ones.


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