discovery

Preparing to Tag Sharks

Posted Sun, Sep 19, 2010 by Emily Fisher to andy dehart, discovery, gulf oil spill, oceana gulf expedition, shark tagging

The bow of the Oceana Latitude. © Oceana/Carlos Suarez

It’s time for the next leg of the journey: shark tagging! Dustin reports:

The Oceana Latitude is now headed South, down the west coast of Florida.

While the ship is docked in St. Petersburg for the next few days, scientists from Oceana and the National Aquarium, including Discovery Channel shark advisor Andy Dehart, will work to tag various shark species several miles offshore.

In addition to collecting basic data from each shark, the attached metal tags can provide future information on stock identity, movements and migration, abundance, age and growth, mortality, and behavior. The tags can also help identify these sharks later as those that were in the general vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster, which could help to determine the long-term impacts of the oil spill on shark populations.

Oceana hopes to see several shark species, including spinner, blacktip, blacknose, dusky, lemon, bull, mako, tiger, hammerhead and bonnethead.


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Shark Skateboards Up for Bids

Posted Thu, Aug 5, 2010 by Emily Fisher to discovery, online auction, shark week, sharks, skateboards, x games

As you know, Oceana is a partner in Discovery’s Shark Week this year. Meanwhile, Discovery is a partner of this summer’s X-Games, so they asked artists to design and paint shark-themed skateboard decks to display at their X-Games tent.

The results are beautiful, and you can now bid on the skateboard decks online. The proceeds go directly to Oceana to help our shark conservation efforts.

There are some really cool ones -- check ‘em out!


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Five Ways to Help Protect Sharks

Posted Thu, Aug 5, 2010 by Emily Fisher to adopt a shark, congress, discovery, five ways to protect sharks, shark fin soup, shark week

shark

You know that sharks are in trouble around the world. Their populations are crashing as a result of overfishing, shark finning and bycatch, and the oceans are suffering as a result.

So this shark week, what can you do to help save sharks? Here are five ways. Have other suggestions? Let us know in the comments.

1. Tell Congress to stop shark finning

The Shark Conservation Act would end shark finning in U.S. waters and make us world leaders in shark conservation. Tell your Senators to support shark protections by passing this bill.

2. Keep shark off the menu

Not only is it ecologically irresponsible to serve shark meat, it is also unhealthy. Since they are at the top of the ocean food chain, sharks bioaccumulate high amounts of mercury. For women who are pregnant or may become pregnant, this is especially dangerous. The bottom line? Stay away from shark meat.

3. Adopt a shark

Yes, sharks can be soft and cuddly -- when you adopt one from Oceana. When you adopt a hammerhead shark, you’ll receive a hammerhead stuffed animal with a personalized adoption certificate, and your donation will help our work to protect them. 

4. Educate yourself and others about sharks

There are dozens of species of sharks, from toothy great whites to filter-feeding whale sharks. The more you learn about these creatures, the more you will love them. So educate yourself and your loved ones -- especially the shark-fearing ones.

5. Spread the word: We should be scared for sharks

As our shark spokeswoman, January Jones, said in her PSA, we shouldn’t be scared of sharks, we should be scared for them. Spread this message on Facebook and Twitter -- and any other way you know how.


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