local seafood

A Perfect Recipe for National Seafood Month

Posted Tue, Oct 15, 2013 by Justine Hausheer to local seafood, national seafood month, seafood

(Photo: Swamibu)

October is National Seafood Month, and we have a warm, rich shellfish dish that's perfect for the cool fall evenings. We featured Chef April Bloomfield's delicious recipe "Oyster Pan Roast with Tarragon Toasts" in the recent issuse of Oceana magazine. Read an excerpt about Chelf Bloomfield below, and then visit the 
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Behind the Scenes: Seafood Fraud

Posted Thu, Oct 3, 2013 by Justine Hausheer to local seafood, national seafood fraud report, seafood fraud

(Photo: Oceana / Jenn Hueting)

October is National Seafood month—the perfect time to dig in to all of the delicious dishes that come from the sea. But before you head to the market, you should read up on the nation-wide issue of seafood fraud.


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A Fishery for the Future: Off the Hook

Posted Wed, Dec 14, 2011 by Emily Fisher to bay of fundy, community supported fishery, csa for fish, csf, fishing, haddock, hake, halifax, local seafood, nova scotia, off the hook, overfishing, sustainable seafood

nova scotia boats

Fishing boats in Nova Scotia. © Becky Cliche via http://www.offthehookcsf.ca

A group of hook-and-line fishermen in Nova Scotia are helping change the face of fishing, and we think you should know about them.

Perhaps you’re familiar with the CSA model, or Community Supported Agriculture, in which subscribers pay for weekly shares of a farm’s produce. Off the Hook is a Community Supported Fishery using this model with fish, connecting a co-operative of small-scale fishermen from the Bay of Fundy to subscribers in and around Halifax, Nova Scotia. Customers receive weekly shares of the co-op’s catch of fresh whole haddock and hake. 

The benefits? Community Supported Fisheries like Off the Hook provide more family income, more market choices, and increased ownership and control. Subscribers get better access to the freshest local, sustainable fish along with a better connection to local fishing communities and the ocean. It’s a win-win.

Off the Hook has been named a finalist in a global competition being held by National Geographic called "Turning the Tide on Coastal Fisheries". The contest aims to find community supported projects that provide innovative solutions to overfishing. Off the Hook was the only project in North America to make it to the top 10 out of more than 100 entries from 48 countries.

The last phase of the contest is an online vote that ends Dec 24. If Off the Hook makes it to the top three, they will be flown down to DC to meet with key stakeholders in international fisheries management and marine conservation. The winner receives a $20,000 grant, and National Geographic will produce a video that features their project.

Vote for Off the Hook and spread the word about Community Supported Fisheries!


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Fish: the Next Local Food

Posted Mon, Nov 8, 2010 by PaulGreenberg to four fish, local seafood, paul greenberg, sustainable seafood

This is the last in a series of four guest posts by Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food.

A sanitized version of an old Yiddish proverb advises: "don't excrete where you eat." An incredibly obvious and comprehensible point. And yet, we Americans have been doing pretty much exactly the opposite for much of our history. 

Millions of tons of human sewage, not to mention excretion, from various shore-based factories and power plants and now the BP blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, have fouled our local waterways and made much of the seafood that is at our coastal doorsteps either rare or inedible.

Combine that with agricultural runoff and the habitat destruction caused by the dredging of harbors and you have an obvious result: Americans now get around 80% of their seafood from abroad and the seafood that is caught within our borders is often brought to us from distant offshore fishing grounds or from still relatively untainted places like Alaska.  

Which is why I feel strongly that the next "local food" movement should be one of reclaiming local seafood and bringing regional fish back onto the menus of our coastal cities. 


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