Oceana magazine

Reservations For 9 Billion, Please

Posted Wed, Oct 23, 2013 by Justine Hausheer to andy sharpless, Oceana magazine, suzannah evans, the perfect protein

(Photo: Brant Shenkarow)

“Imagine a world in which seafood is the world’s most-eaten protein.” In this excerpt from The Perfect Protein, published in the recent issue of Oceana magazine, Oceana CEO Andy Sharpless and Suzannah Evans explore how seafood is the key to feeding our growing world.


Continue reading...

Supporter Spotlight: Mitzi Gaskins

Posted Tue, Oct 22, 2013 by Justine Hausheer to marriot, Mitzi Gaskins, Oceana magazine, oceana supporters

(Photo: Oceana)

In each issue of Oceana magazine, we sit down with one of Oceana’s many supporters to learn why they are passionate about the oceans. In the most recent issue, we chatted with Mitzi Gaskins, vice president and global brand manager for JW Marriot Hotels and Resorts. Read an excerpt below, or head over to Oceana magazine to see the full Q&A.


Continue reading...

Ask Dr. Pauly: What are distant-water fishing fleets, and how do they affect overfishing?

Posted Mon, Oct 21, 2013 by Justine Hausheer to daniel pauly, fishing, Oceana magazine, overfishing

(Photo: Oceana / Juan Cuetos) 

Maximum sustainable yield, bycatch and discards, exclusive economic zones, essential fish habitat. If you’ve ever read one of these terms and wondered what it meant, you’re in luck. In each issue of Oceana magazine, fisheries scientist and Oceana board member Dr. Daniel Pauly breaks down a commonly used fisheries term.


Continue reading...

Q&A: Callum Roberts

Posted Thu, Dec 13, 2012 by Emily Fisher to Callum Roberts, Ocean of Life, Oceana magazine

Callum Roberts is a professor of marine conservation at the University of York in England and author of the 2007 book “The Unnatural History of the Sea.” His second book, “The Ocean of Life”, was published this spring. Oceana asked Roberts about the new book and why we need a “New Deal” for the oceans. This Q&A is from the new issue of Oceana magazine.


How does the Ocean of Life differ from your first book, "The Unnatural History of the Sea"?

“The Unnatural History of the Sea” is about how 1,000 years of hunting and fishing have changed the oceans. It is a voyage through time and around the world in which I let eye witnesses tell their stories of discovery, plunder, glory and heartbreak, and in doing so let us see the oceans in a new light, as if for the first time. “The Ocean of Life” is painted on a bigger canvas. In it I go back to the very beginning in an effort to answer questions like, where did the oceans come from, what were they like before the Cambrian explosion of larger life, who were the first seafood lovers and where did they live? Although I cover the long history of fishing, it is by way of prelude to an exploration of the many other ways in which we are changing the oceans. Almost without noticing it and within my lifetime, humanity has gained dominion over the sea.

What's the most surprising thing you learned about the oceans while researching and writing "The Ocean of Life"?

Probably the most startling and troubling thing I learned, when I drew together the many intertwining strands of our influence, is that the oceans are changing faster today and in more ways than in all of human history. In fact, we may have to go all the way back to the planetary cataclysm that ended the reign of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago to find a more rapid transformation of the sea.


Continue reading...

New Issue of Oceana Magazine: Ocean Heroes and More

Posted Thu, Sep 8, 2011 by Emily Fisher to baltic, christies, events, hamptons, ocean heroes, Oceana magazine, photos, robert f kennedy jr, seafood fraud

The new issue of Oceana magazine is hot off the press! In this issue, you’ll learn about our latest news and victories, and lots more, including:

*Profiles of our 2011 Ocean Heroes, shark-loving Sophi Bromenshenkel and sea lion-rescuing Peter Wallerstein

*A thought-provoking Q&A with environmental lawyer Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

*The lowdown on our new campaign to combat Seafood Fraud

*A report on this summer’s expedition in the icy Baltic Sea

*Photos from our recent events: Hamptons Splash, Christie’s Green Auction and World Oceans Day

Check it out and pass it on!


Continue reading...

Paul Greenberg: Uniting the Fishies and Foodies

Posted Tue, Feb 15, 2011 by Emily Fisher to books, cod, fishing, four fish, interview, Oceana magazine, paul greenberg, salmon, seabass, seafood, tuna

The new issue of the Oceana magazine features a Q&A with author Paul Greenberg, whose book Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food, has won praise from conservationists and foodies alike. Greenberg also wrote several guest blogs posts for us in the fall. Needless to say, we are big fans. You'll see why:

Why salmon, sea bass, cod and tuna?

Salmon, usually farmed Atlantic salmon, is like the corn of the sea, grown on every continent now, save Antarctica, even though it historically never lived south of the equator.

Sea bass, that catch-all name that describes so many fish, has become the market niche of the white, meaty fish.  The name "bass" itself is a cover for a troubling fish swapping game where we progressively replace depleted species with new ones and give them the same name so that consumers don't notice the swap.

Similarly, cod represents an even more massive example of fish swapping. Only with cod, you're talking about the swapping of literally billions of pounds of fish for a whole array of both farmed and wild fish that fill a similar flesh niche.


Continue reading...

Extra, Extra: Oceana’s Winter Magazine

Posted Thu, Feb 10, 2011 by Emily Fisher to chile, gulf of mexico expedition, january jones, jeff bridges, Oceana magazine, punta de choros, sala y gomez

The winter issue of the Oceana magazine is now online for your reading pleasure!

 We have lots of goodies for you in this issue:

* Visit lovely Punta de Choros, Chile, where we recently achieved a dramatic victory in stopping the construction of a coal-fired power plant.

* Sail into the Gulf of Mexico with the Oceana Latitude expedition.

* Explore Chile’s Sala y Gomez Island, whose waters were recently declared a no-take zone after our preliminary expedition there.

* Dive in with actress January Jones in her second trip with Oceana to swim with sharks. This time? The majestic whale shark.

And of course, read about our latest victories and events and find a tasty sustainable seafood recipe.  Enjoy and let us know what you think!


Continue reading...

New Oceana Magazine Hot Off the Press

Posted Tue, Sep 14, 2010 by Emily Fisher to adrian grenier, bluefin tuna, gulf oil spill, Oceana magazine, photo essay, seafood traceability

The latest issue of the Oceana magazine is available for your reading pleasure. In this issue, along with the latest news, victories and events, we bring you the following outstanding ocean features:

*An interview with Oceana’s Pacific Science Director and oil pollution expert, Jeff Short

*Do you know where your seafood comes from? Digging into the confusing (and sometimes sickening) question of seafood traceability in the U.S.

*A photo essay capturing the Gulf of Mexico oil spill

*A Q&A with “Entourage” star and Oceana supporter, Adrian Grenier, who recently filmed a PSA about bluefin tuna with us.

Read all of these and more in the full issue.


Continue reading...

The Spring Oceana Magazine is Here!

Posted Tue, Jun 29, 2010 by MollyH to andy sharpless, gulf oil spill, loggerhead sea turtles, oceana in belize, Oceana magazine, sustainable seafood, wind energy

The new issue of the Oceana Magazine has arrived!

This issue features news from the Gulf, including an in-depth look at the dangers of offshore drilling. The magazine also explores offshore wind as a source of clean, safe, sustainable energy. 

Also included: updated news on the status of loggerhead sea turtles, and the latest happenings in our newest office in Belize, plus a profile of "Top Chef" finalist Bryan Voltaggio. Chef Voltaggio even gave us the recipe for one of his favorite sustainable fish dinners so you can make it at home!

Check out the magazine for more Oceana goodies.


Continue reading...