portugal

Ranger Expedition Uncovers Seamount Life, Pollution

Posted Fri, Oct 19, 2012 by Peter Brannen to algarve, bottom trawling, deep-sea sharks, frogmouth, gorringe bank, portugal

Pink frogmouth captured by ROV camera ©Oceana

In the past few weeks Oceana's Ranger expedition has been exploring a series of underwater mountains 130 miles West of Portugal known as the Gorringe bank. Formed along with the Atlantic Ocean as Pangaea pulled apart 145 to 155 million years ago, the Gorringe bank juts from depths of as much as 16,000 feet to only 100 feet below the surface. These underwater mountain ranges are a hotspot for marine life, as nutrient rich water upwells to the seamount peaks.

gorringe kelp

Closer to the surface a familiar parade of whales, dolphins, swordfish and barracuda visit lush kelp forests, while shearwaters and petrels circle above. As you dive deeper though, as the Ranger expedition has with its underwater robot (ROV), you enter a somewhat stranger world, but one that is no less diverse. This is the domain of the dragon fish, the fan corals, the otherworldly deep-sea sharks, the churlish-looking pink frogmouth and still more species unknown to science. Other animals are ambassadors of the deep, patrolling up and down the seamounts in search of prey

“During last year’s expedition we found some new species whose existence in the Gorringe was unknown, such as branching black coral, hydrocoral, dogfish, bird’s nest sponge, and various gorgonia”, says Ricardo Aguilar, Director of Research at Oceana in Europe. “There are dozens of species which have not been identified yet. We hope that they will provide new data on these ecosystems, and facilitate the protection and conservation of this unique enclave.”

Unfortunately, as the ranger expedition has also discovered, this habitat is also home to an increasing amount of trash, especially abandoned fishing gear.

sponge

By documenting and exploring habitat, Oceana is gathering data about this unique ecosystem that will be crucial in formulating conservation plans that will hopefully protect the area from malign human influences like pollution and bottom trawling.

Keep up with the Ranger expedition online and check out the latest pictures and video.


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Expedition in the Med Comes to a Close

Posted Wed, Aug 31, 2011 by Emily Fisher to gorringe seamount, mediterranean sea, portugal, the ranger

A marbled electric ray in Portugal's Gorringe Bank seamount. © Oceana/Carlos Suarez

This year’s expedition in the Mediterranean and Portuguese Atlantic has come to a close, and we’re proud to report that it was a resounding success.

The highlight of the Ranger's journey was Portugal’s Gorringe seamount, which is recognized as a hotspot in the region but has not been extensively explored.

The base of the Gorringe seamount is more than 15,000 feet deep, while its peaks are just about 100 feet deep. Need a visualization? Take one of the United States’ tallest peaks, such as Washington’s Mount Rainier, submerge it under water, and add a bunch of spectacular marine life. There you have it.

The expedition team found kelp forests, deep-sea sponge fields, black coral forests, extensive oyster beds and over 100 different species including spotted dolphins, minke whales, sea pens, slipper lobsters and fish such as orange roughies, longspine snipefish, morays and conger eels.

During the expedition, a team of scientists and divers collected photos and video footage and an underwater robot (ROV) recorded high-resolution images on the sea beds down to nearly 2,000 feet deep.


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Photo of the Week: Colorful Octopus

Posted Wed, Jul 13, 2011 by Emily Fisher to algarve, diving, oceana ranger, octopus, portugal

octopus

© Oceana/Carlos Minguell

The Oceana Ranger has now been at sea for several weeks, and as usual, the crew has been sending us some incredible photos. Starting this week, I’ll be posting a photo of the week from the journey.

This week’s photo of a beautiful octopus comes from a dive the team did off Portugal’s beautiful Algarve region, in Pedra de Martinhal. As the photographer noted, this curious octopus wasn’t scared off by the camera, perhaps because it was mesmerized by its reflection in the glass.

Stay tuned for more great photos in the coming weeks, and check out the Ranger set on Flickr.


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Ranger Sets Sail to Explore Seamounts and Sea Canyons

Posted Wed, Jun 22, 2011 by Emily Fisher to diving, expeditions, gorringe bank, mediterranean, portugal, ROV, sailing, sea canyons, seamounts, the ranger

kelp in gorringe bank

Kelp in Portugal’s Gorringe Bank in the Atlantic Ocean. © Oceana/Juan Carlos Calvin

It’s a busy and exciting time of year for our campaigners on the water -- and for those of us who get to see the photos and videos of the incredible marine life and habitats that they send back to land.

As you know if you’ve been following the blog for the past week or so, we have a team off the coast of Oregon right now exploring important ecological areas. And today, our team in Europe is launching its seventh annual summer expedition.

This year the Oceana catamaran, Ranger, will sail for two months through the western Mediterranean and the Atlantic to study seamounts and sea canyons, ocean environments that are rich in biodiversity but relatively unexplored due to their depth and complex terrains. That’s where our scientists, divers and underwater robot (ROV) come in.

In one of the most exciting aspects of this year’s expedition, Oceana will collaborate with Portuguese government officials and scientists to investigate the Gorringe Bank, a little-explored seamount and an oasis of biodiversity southwest of Portugal. Oceana last surveyed these waters in 2005, but this time around, using the ROV, the team will be exploring and documenting areas more than 2,500 feet -- that’s about half a mile! -- below the surface of the ocean.

The ROV will record high-resolution videos and photos, which will ultimately be used to propose the creation of marine protected areas and other conservation measures.

We can’t wait to see what our teams find in the ocean’s depths. We’ll keep you updated as the journey progresses!


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