seagrass

Ocean Roundup: Acidification Masking Shark Smelling Abilities, New Fishery Rule to Protect Endangered Albatross, and More

Posted Wed, Sep 10, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to ocean acidification, octopuses, seagrass, shark conservation

Smooth dogfish could lose their sense of smell from acidification

A smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis). (Photo: Erickson Smith / Flickr Creative Commons)

- NOAA has proposed a new rule to for West Coast commercial fishermen that intends to the endangered short-tailed albatross, a seabird whose numbers are down to 1,200 individuals. The rule requires fishermen to deploy streamer lines, already required off Alaska and Hawaii, which would scare off albatross from eating bait. The Associated Press


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Ocean News: Barbuda Becomes Ocean Conservation Leader in the Caribbean, July Ocean Temperatures Hit Record Highs, and More

Posted Tue, Aug 19, 2014 by Brianna Elliott to Barbuda, ocean acidification, ocean termperatures, seagrass, seismic airgun blasting

Barbuda is a leader in ocean conservation in the Caribbean

A rocky ledge off Barbuda. (Photo: Ron Kroetz / Flickr Creative Commons)

- Scientists say that seagrass habitat is being lost at the same rate as Amazon rain forests, or about two soccer fields per hour. The scientists warn that this is key habitat for many young fish, so the loss of seagrass could have a huge impact on fisheries. BBC


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New Report: Why Healthy Oceans Need Sea Turtles

Posted Thu, Jul 22, 2010 by Emily Fisher to algae, ecosystems, gulf of mexico, gulf oil spill, new oceana report, sea turtles, seagrass, why healthy oceans need sea turtles

Imagine a healthy, beautiful ocean. Now remove the sea turtles, one by one.

Not so healthy anymore, is it?

That’s the gist of the report we released today, Why Healthy Oceans Need Sea Turtles: The Importance of Sea Turtles to Marine Ecosystems. The report describes the vital roles sea turtles play in the ecosystem, and how the Gulf of Mexico oil spill is further threatening their ability to fulfill those roles.

As the report outlines, sea turtles provide the following important ecosystem services: