sponges

International Talks Underway to Protect North Pacific

Posted Tue, Mar 1, 2011 by callen to bottom trawling, deep sea corals, deep sea ecosystems, freeze the footprint, north pacific ocean, seamounts, sponges

Paragorgia coral, aka bubblegum coral, at the Pratt seamount. © NOAA

The U.S. government is nearing the conclusion of international negotiations for the management of fisheries on the high seas of the North Pacific Ocean. These quiet talks have been ongoing since April 2006 and are likely to conclude this week, which has huge implications for the oceans and Oceana’s work in the region.

Oceana has been participating in these meetings as a member of the U.S. delegation since 2007. Oceana’s Pacific Project Manager, Ben Enticknap, is at this week’s meeting in Vancouver, Canada, working to expand Oceana’s approach to freeze the footprint of bottom trawling and protect important ecological areas to international waters.

The negotiations are between the U.S., Canada, Japan, Russia, China, Korea and Taiwan (Chinese Taipei) and are seeking to establish a new fishery management organization to sustainably manage fisheries on the high seas of the North Pacific Ocean, as well as to establish interim measures to protect “vulnerable marine ecosystems” like seamounts, deep-sea corals, sponges and hydrothermal vents from destructive fishing practices.


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Photos from the Alabama Alps

Posted Tue, Sep 14, 2010 by Emily Fisher to alabama alps, corals, crinoids, gorgonians, gulf of mexico, marine life, moray eel, oceana gulf expedition, oil spill, photos, sponges, the pinnacles

Yesterday you heard about the Latitude’s foray into the Alabama Alps. Today, photos!

Here are some of the cool creatures our deep-sea ROV captured on camera. Which one's your favorite?

Special thanks to Nautica, whose support made our use of the deep sea ROV possible!


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Fact of the Day: Spanish Dancer

Posted Tue, Aug 10, 2010 by MollyH to external gills, Fact of the Day, spanish dancer, sponges

Spanish Dancer (credit: Ana García Redondo and Pedro de Hoz Pastor)

Wonder how the Spanish dancer, or Hexabranchus sanguineus, got its common name? When it swims, the frilled edges of its mantle resemble the color and movement of the skirts of a flamenco dancer.

When they're not swimming, Spanish dancers crawl along relatively flat surfaces with the edges of their mantle tucked up close to their bodies (see the picture). They feed on sponges and can produce a toxic chemical to protect themselves from predation. 


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