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Blog Tags: Bottom Trawling

Ocean Roundup: Vaquita Porpoise Needs Swift Protection, Atlantic Ocean behind Global Warming Slow Down, and More

The vaquita will go extinct if North America doesn't cooperate to save it

A vaquita porpoise (Phocoena sinus), the most endangered marine mammal. (Photo: "Vaquita5 Olson NOAA" by Paula Olson, NOAA, Wikimedia Commons) 

- New research shows that the Atlantic and Southern Oceans may just be behind the slowdown of sea surface temperatures increases after years of rapid warming. Scientists say that heat-storing greenhouse gases have sunk to the depths of these oceans, and not the Pacific as previously assumed. The Guardian


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Bottom Trawling Threatens Deep Sea Ecosystems, Studies Say

Cod trapped in a trawler net

Cod trapped on the net of an Estonian trawler in the port of Wladyslawowo, Southern Baltic Proper, Poland. (Photo: Oceana / LX)

Cod, flounder, and halibut make delicious seafood, but they’re often not sustainably harvested. In fact, they’re likely caught with one of the most destructive types of fishing gear: bottom trawls. These large, heavy nets are dragged across large areas of seafloor, and inevitably clear-cut everything in their path.


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CEO Note: Oceana Victory - Portugal and Spain Protect Seafloor Habitat from Bottom Trawling

A reef in Spain's Balearic Islands

Cabrera National Park in Spain's Balearic Islands. (Photo: Oceana / Juan Cuetos)

I have great news about two important new campaign victories in Europe: Portugal and Spain will now protect more than 2 million square kilometers of seafloor habitat from destructive fishing gears.


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Portugal Protects More Than Two Million Square Kilometers from Bottom Trawls

coral reef, deep sea coral, algae ground

Deep sea coral and anelid (fireworm) on algae ground. (Oceana / Juan Carlos Calvin)

In a remarkable effort to protect its waters, the Portuguese government issued a decree prohibiting deep-sea fishing in an area spanning 2,280,000 square kilometers. Even though the decree exempts longlining, which is authorized under certain conditions, it is an immensely significant step in protecting deep-sea species and ecosystems.


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Stand Up for the Deep

(Photo: Oceana in Europe)

Deep ocean species grow slowly and produce few offspring, making them very vulnerable to overfishing. But the European Union fleet in the North-East Atlantic fishes down to depths of 1,500 meters, using bottom-fishing gear that destroys thousand-year-old corals and sponge beds. Even more worrying, up to 80 percent of trawl catches are discarded and thrown away.


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EU deep sea fishery protection in one infographic

See below for complete infographic. (c) Oceana

Rainbow colored tropical fish, jumping dolphins, and incredible sea turtles are often what comes to mind when thinking of the oceans. The deep sea, dark and less colorful, but possibly even more awe-inspiring, can sometimes be ignored since it is so far below our world. That may be why, in the European Union (EU), the main regulation to manage fisheries occurring in this fragile world have not been updated since 2002.


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Bien Hecho! Costa Rica Bans Shrimp Trawl Nets

This image shows how trawl nets effectively "bulldoze" the sea floor, destroying centuries' old coral formations and catching anything in their path. 

We are excited to share some great news out of our international offices – Costa Rica has banned the use of trawl nets to catch shrimp throughout the country! Trawl nets destroy our oceans -- ripping up the seafloor, razing coral reefs, and catching huge amounts of marine creatures as bycatch – so this ruling is a major victory for our oceans. It’s estimated that 871,000 tons of bony fishes, sharks, and rays were caught in Costa Rica as incidental bycatch of shrimp trawling between 1950 and 2008.


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Alaskan Skate Nurseries Gain Protection

On Thursday, six skate nurseries in Alaska’s Bering Sea were designated as “Habitat Areas of Particular Concern.”  Skates are a member of the ray family, and live on the seafloor.  The designation requires consultation with the National Marine Fisheries Service before activities such as offshore oil and gas development can take place.

The protected nurseries are six of only 13 or 14 total sites in the Bering Sea where skates lay their leathery egg cases, commonly known as mermaid’s purses, in deep submarine canyons.  Skate eggs take three years hatch, making them extremely vulnerable to seafloor destruction. 

With over 200 species of skate around the globe, they are part of the ancient family that includes sharks and rays.  While the family has survived many mass extinctions, including those that killed the dinosaurs, they have not evolved to survive the dramatic impacts of humans on their habitat.  Many species, including the common skate, have been dangerously overfished, and the nurseries in the Bering Sea are critical to the continued survival of skates in the North Pacific.


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Chile Becomes First Country in World to Protect All Seamounts from Devastating Bottom Trawling!

Coral formations in Juan Fernandez archipelago lie among Chilean seamounts

As you enjoy those last holiday cookies before the New Year comes with its resolutions, we’d love to share one final present for you to enjoy: we are thrilled to announce that last week, the country of Chile became the first in the world to protect all of its seamounts from the devastating effects of bottom trawling! Oceana CEO Andrew Sharpless and actor and Oceana board member Ted Danson collaborated in an article published by the Huffington Post to share this excellent news with the world.


Seamounts are underwater mountain ranges that are home to an unbelievable array of sea creatures fed by the nutrient-rich water from the deep upwells. The destructive practice of bottom trawling, where large, heavy nets weighing as much as several tons each effectively clear-cut everything living on the seafloor,  causes more direct and avoidable damage to the ocean floor and its creatures than any other human activity in the world.  Although some of Chile’s seamounts have already been damaged or destroyed by the country’s fishing fleet, the December 20 decision closes any further trawling to Chile’s 118 seamounts until scientists have assessed these and other underwater ecosystems off the coast of Chile.


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Ranger Expedition Uncovers Seamount Life, Pollution

Pink frogmouth captured by ROV camera ©Oceana

In the past few weeks Oceana's Ranger expedition has been exploring a series of underwater mountains 130 miles West of Portugal known as the Gorringe bank. Formed along with the Atlantic Ocean as Pangaea pulled apart 145 to 155 million years ago, the Gorringe bank juts from depths of as much as 16,000 feet to only 100 feet below the surface. These underwater mountain ranges are a hotspot for marine life, as nutrient rich water upwells to the seamount peaks.

gorringe kelp

Closer to the surface a familiar parade of whales, dolphins, swordfish and barracuda visit lush kelp forests, while shearwaters and petrels circle above. As you dive deeper though, as the Ranger expedition has with its underwater robot (ROV), you enter a somewhat stranger world, but one that is no less diverse. This is the domain of the dragon fish, the fan corals, the otherworldly deep-sea sharks, the churlish-looking pink frogmouth and still more species unknown to science. Other animals are ambassadors of the deep, patrolling up and down the seamounts in search of prey

“During last year’s expedition we found some new species whose existence in the Gorringe was unknown, such as branching black coral, hydrocoral, dogfish, bird’s nest sponge, and various gorgonia”, says Ricardo Aguilar, Director of Research at Oceana in Europe. “There are dozens of species which have not been identified yet. We hope that they will provide new data on these ecosystems, and facilitate the protection and conservation of this unique enclave.”

Unfortunately, as the ranger expedition has also discovered, this habitat is also home to an increasing amount of trash, especially abandoned fishing gear.

sponge

By documenting and exploring habitat, Oceana is gathering data about this unique ecosystem that will be crucial in formulating conservation plans that will hopefully protect the area from malign human influences like pollution and bottom trawling.

Keep up with the Ranger expedition online and check out the latest pictures and video.


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