The Beacon

Blog Tags: Cuttlefish

Photos: How Cuttlefish Master the Art of Disguise

Cuttlefish are a member of the cephalopod family

A common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) off Italy. (Photo: Oceana / Carlos Suárez)

This week marks International Cephalopod Awareness Days, a time to celebrate these invertebrates and bring attention to their conservation. Earlier this week, Oceana discussed octopus vision, and also recently celebrated them during Cephalopod Week. Now, Oceana is bringing attention to a lesser-known cephalopod through a Creature Feature.  


Continue reading...

Ocean Roundup: Giant Cuttlefish Decline Remains a Mystery, President Obama Creates World's Largest MPA, and More

Giant cuttlefish decline in Australia is a mystery to scientists

An Australian giant cuttlefish (Sepia apama). Giant cuttlefish are declining in South Australian waters. (Photo: Richard Ling / Flickr Creative Commons)

- Federal officials say the endangered Hawaiian monk seal population may be making a slow comeback. Pup numbers have slowly increased from previous years, from 103 individuals in 2013 to 121 this year. The Dodo


Continue reading...

Photos: Happy Cephalopod Week!

Common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) photographed in Portugal

Common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) photographed in Portugal during a 2011 Oceana Ranger Expedition. (Photo: Oceana / Carlos Minguell)

You may have heard of the elusive vampire squid, a species that emits mucus covered in bioluminescence to trick its predators, or the dumbo octopus, the deepest-living of all the octopus species. Creepy and otherworldly as they may seem, each of these spineless creatures plays an important role in ocean ecosystems.


Continue reading...

Fact of the Day: Australian Giant Cuttlefish

cuttlefish

Australian Giant Cuttlefish (credit: Richard Ling)

Of the approximately 100 species of cuttlefish, the Australian giant cuttlefish is the largest cuttlefish in the world.  They can grow almost five feet long and weigh almost 30 pounds.   

The coolest thing about these colossal cephalopods is their ability to change color for a number of reasons, including aggression, excitement, camouflage, or mating. They can change color so effectively that they can become almost entirely invisible when hiding among rocks and in caves. When they want to be noticed, they can put on a brilliant display of colors and flashes, particularly during the winter mating season. 


Continue reading...

Browse by Date