The Beacon

Blog Tags: European Commission

Karmenu Vella Becomes New European Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries

Karmenu Vella becomes new leader of the European Commissioner

Karmenu Vella being interviewed by European Parliament Committees. (Photo: European Parliament / Flickr Creative Commons)

Last week, the European Parliament voted to confirm Karmenu Vella as the new Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries of the European Commission, which will be headed by President Jean-Claude Juncker.


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Oceana Supports Recent European Commission Moves to End Overfishing

Ten EU Member States are receiving penalties for overfishing

Early morning trawling vessels in the Mediterranean. (Photo: Oceana / Juan Cuetos)

The European Commission (EC) recently announced that ten Member States will be penalized for exceeding fishing quotas in 2013. Oceana supports the deductions in order to reverse the damage done to overfished stocks, and denounces the Member States’ failure to emplace sound control measures.


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South Korea, Ghana, and Curaçao Given Six Months to Stop Illegal Fishing

The European Commission is giving three countries six months to stop iuu fishing

A bottom trawler in the Southern Baltic. (Photo: Oceana / LX)

South Korea, Ghana, and Curaçao must now act quickly to combat illegal fishing, as the European Commission granted these three countries only six more months to improve efforts to stop illegal, unreported, and unregulated  (IUU) fishing in their waters.


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EU Proposes Full Ban on Shark Finning at Sea

blue shark

Blue sharks would benefit from an EU shark finning ban. © Karin Leonard/Marine Photobank

It has been a banner year for shark conservation – and the good news just keeps rolling in, this time out of Europe.

Today the EU's executive arm proposed a complete ban on shark finning, the practice of cutting off the fins of sharks, often while they are still alive, and then throwing the wounded animals back into the sea.

We’re proud to report that Oceana played a big part in securing this victory; our colleagues in Europe have been campaigning for a shark finning ban in the EU for years.

If the proposal is adopted by the European Parliament and the Council, all vessels fishing in EU waters and all EU vessels fishing anywhere in the world will have to land sharks with the fins still attached – a boon for vulnerable shark populations around the world.

The EU includes some of the world’s major shark fishing nations – Spain, France, Portugal, and the UK. The largest EU shark fisheries occur on the high seas, where Spanish and Portuguese pelagic longliners that historically targeted mainly tuna and swordfish now increasingly catch sharks, particularly oceanic species such as blue sharks and shortfin mako sharks. More than half of large oceanic shark species are currently considered threatened.

Globally, up to 73 million sharks are killed each year to satisfy the demand of the international shark fin market. EU nations combined catch the second-largest share of sharks – 14% of the world’s reported shark catches.

Today's proposal strengthens the existing EU legislation banning shark finning, which allows shark finning in certain situations. Currently the fins and bodies can be separated on board vessels with special permits, and then landed at different ports. The EU tries to ensure that no bodies have been discarded by making sure the weight of the fins does not exceed 5 percent of the entire weight of the fish landed. The new rule would close this loophole.

"A stronger ban on shark finning will bring significant benefits for shark fisheries management and conservation, not only in Europe, but in all of the oceans where European vessels are catching sharks," said Dr. Allison Perry, marine wildlife scientist with Oceana in Europe. 

Congrats to everyone who helped score this huge win for sharks, and fingers crossed for approval by the EU Council and Parliament!


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