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Blog Tags: Hawksbill Sea Turtle

If You Could be Any Ocean Animal...

OH_animals

Have you ever dreamed of being a dolphin? Or maybe an anglerfish, octopus, or sea turtle?

Exploring the oceans from one of these animals points of view would be an exciting (and eye opening) experience.

So what marine animal would you be if you had the chance to be any creature in the ocean? We posed this question to our Ocean Heroes finalists, and here’s what they had to say. See if you can match their responses to the pictures above (answers at the bottom of this post)!

Michele Hunter – Harbor seal

Hardy Jones – Sperm whale

Kristofor Lofgren – Mako shark

Dave Rauschkolb – Porpoise

Richard Steiner – Polar bear (I like the odds and the challenge they face)

Donald Voss – Humpback whale

Sara Brenes – Tiger Shark

Calvineers – Blue whale

Sam Harris – Tiger Shark

James Hemphill – Hawksbill Sea Turtle (I have always been amazed at all the colors on its shell and how gracefully and peacefully it swims)

Teakahla WhiteCloud – Dolphin

Make sure to vote for your favorite Ocean Heroes, open from now until July 11th. Stay tuned to learn more about our finalists!

Photo Credits (clockwise from top left): Sperm Whale: Oceana/Juan Cuentos, Tiger Shark: Albert Kok, Harbor Seal: NOAA, Hawksbill Turtle: NOAA/Caroline Rogers, Porpoise: NOAA, Tiger Shark: Austin Gallagher, Humpback Whale: NOAA, Dolphin: Oceana/Eduardo Sorenson, Mako Shark: NOAA, Polar bear: NOAA, Blue Whale: NOAA (middle)


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Thursday Trivia: Hawksbill Sea Turtle

hawksbill sea turtle

The adult hawksbill sea turtle lives in shallow warm water in coral reefs and mangrove areas around the globe.

This type of turtle is named for its beak-shaped mouth, which it uses to pry food out of nooks in a reef (tweet us their favorite food and you could win a prize!)—they also have two claws on each front flipper.

Like other sea turtles, hawksbills lay their eggs on sandy beaches, cover the clutch, and then head back to the ocean. When the eggs hatch, baby hawksbills make their way to the ocean. They can’t dive as well as other types of turtles, though, so they typically eat seaweed closer to the surface as they grow up. Less than one in 1000 hawksbill eggs will survive to adulthood.

Hawksbill sea turtles suffer the consequences of beaches that are no longer safe for nesting, unsafe fishing equipment, and struggling reefs, but they are also hunted by humans, particularly for their shells, which are the chief source of tortoiseshell. International law prohibits trading hawksbill shells.

Oceana’s sea turtle campaign focuses on preventing sea turtle bycatch, protecting habitat, and promoting legislation that keeps turtles safe. You can learn more about hawksbill sea turtles from Oceana’s marine wildlife encyclopedia.


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Fact of the Day: Hawksbill Sea Turtle

Today’s Fact of the Day is about the beautiful hawksbill sea turtle. 

This sea turtle has a particularly breathtaking carapace (or top shell).  Unfortunately, as a result, hawksbill sea turtles were poached as the main source of tortoise shell goods for hundreds of years and are now in danger of extinction. 

Unlike other sea turtles, when hawksbills are on land they walk using diagonally opposite flippers, rather than moving their front flippers in tandem as they do when they swim. 

Check out what you can do to help the hawksbill sea turtles or browse for other ocean facts. (And of course, check back tomorrow for another FOTD!)


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