The Beacon

Blog Tags: Plastic Pollution

Wyatt Workman: Artist, Ocean Lover, Wunderkind

Wyatt Workman (left) and friends.

We continue to be astounded by the generosity of our supporters, and seven-year-old ocean lover and artist Wyatt Workman is one shining example.

Last week Wyatt held an art show to benefit Oceana that raised a whopping $2,400 for ocean conservation. Seven years old! People, this is one cool kid.

Around 200 people came to the show, where Wyatt displayed and sold his own art, plus a movie and book he made this summer about the ocean “trash monster”, and a T-shirt he designed that says “I am NOT a Trash Monster!” Wyatt and his friends talked to visitors about ocean pollution and convinced them to sign his pledge to use less plastic.

Thank you so much, Wyatt and friends!


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One Woman, One Beach, and One Year of Trash

Image via the Los Angeles Times

Earlier this week we heard the latest from one of our 2010 Ocean Heroes, Robin Culler, leader of the Shark Finatics.

Today, another update, this time from Ocean Hero finalist Sara Bayles. Sara was just featured in the Los Angeles Times for her ongoing effort to spend 20 minutes a day for 365 non-consecutive days collecting trash from her Santa Monica beach. She weighs the garbage and keeps a tally on her blog, The Daily Ocean.

We’re glad she’s getting the recognition she deserves. Kudos to you, Sara!

In addition to starting your own beach cleanup like Sara, you can take our pledge to use less plastic if you haven't already.

 


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Do One Green Thing: Nix Bottled Water

This is the second in a series of posts about how to green your life, week by week.

This week, thanks to Mindy Pennybacker’s Do One Green Thing: Saving the Earth through Simple, Everyday Choices , I decided to confront my bottled water addiction. Like most addicts, I tell myself that I’m not addicted. Sure, I’ll indulge in bottled water every now and then, but what’s the harm in that, right?

Wrong! If one in 20 Americans stopped buying disposable water bottles, we would eliminate 30 million pounds of plastic waste a year. When Do One Green Thing hit me with this fact, it blew me away. When did it become socially acceptable to eject 30 million pounds of non-biodegradable waste onto the planet? Sure, some of the plastic is recycled, but an estimated 80 percent is placed in landfills, and finds its way to our local waterways and oceans.


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California Could Trash Plastic Bags for Good

Nothing we use for five minutes should pollute our oceans for 500 years.

That’s the message in a new PSA about the plastic bag bill that’s coming up for a vote this August in California. If it passes, California will be the first state with a state-wide ban on plastic bags.

Watch the video, which came to us from our friend Adrian Grenier and his website, SHFT.com, and let’s hope the bill passes.

 


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Ocean Hero Finalists: Sara Bayles

sara bayles

Image courtesy Sara Bayles.

This is the fifth in a series of posts about this year’s Ocean Hero finalists.

Today’s featured finalist, Sara Bayles, is the author of The Daily Ocean blog, which documents her experiment to see how much debris she can collect from her local beach in 365 non-consecutive days.

For 20 minutes at a time she has removed more than 450 pounds of trash from a beach in Santa Monica in just over 110 days. On The Daily Ocean, Sara exposes our dependence on single-use plastic while challenging her readers to make small shifts in their own lives.


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Save the Oceans, Trash Your Friends

We received an e-mail this morning from our friend J. Nichols:

"Dude, I just totally trashed the Oceana website: You can see the mess here:  http://bit.ly/9nTUhz"

Very funny, J -- and Happy April Fool’s Day.

It may be a fun prank from Heal the Bay, but plastic pollution in the oceans is no joke. Our oceans are drowning in debris and plastic bags are a major culprit. Cities and countries around the world have banned or placed fees on plastic bags, but more needs to be done.


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20 Years of Depressing but True Stories About the Oceans

Image via wikimedia commons.

A very happy birthday to E, the Environmental Magazine, which recently turned 20 years old. A lot has happened in the environmental world in those two decades, and a lot has also stayed the same.

This excerpt of their article retrospective brings to mind some all-too-familiar ocean threats. (Oh, and thanks for the shout-out):

"A fish in a net was the cover model for E’s July/August 1996 feature on overfishing. With the headline “Vacuuming the Sea,” the article reported that 70% of the world’s marine fish stocks had been heavily exploited.


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