The Beacon

Blog Tags: Sea Turtles

Recent Studies Provide Insight on Sea Turtle Migration and Future Trends

A Loggerhead sea turtle hatchling

A loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle hatchling makes its way to the ocean. (Photo: Florida Fish and Wildlife / Flickr Creative Commons)

Sea turtles are some of the oceans’ most charismatic species, but there’s still much to be learned about them. Since May 23 is World Turtle Day, we’re spotlighting two recent studies on sea turtles. Read more below to find out more about their migration patterns and how climate change will affect future populations.

Where do sea turtles spend their “lost years”?


Continue reading...

Fighting for Turtle Excluder Devices in Louisiana

sea turtle swimming in Mexico

(Photo: Oceana / Tim Calver)

In honor of the fourteenth World Turtle Day, created by the American Tortoise Rescue to celebrate and protect turtles and tortoises around the world, we’re taking a close look at one of the biggest threats facing sea turtles today.


Continue reading...

Oceana Convenes New International Partnership to Save Endangered Pacific Leatherback Sea Turtle

The Bupati Tambrauw showcases the signed copy of the declaration with fellow signatories. (Photo: Oceana)

When Oceana first began its work to protect critically endangered Pacific leatherbacks off the U.S. West Coast, we had no idea that these prehistoric turtles would eventually provide a global link to connect us to conservationists half way across the planet.


Continue reading...

Are We Giving Loggerhead Sea Turtles Enough Protections to Survive?

Loggerhead sea turtles face myriad threats and risks. Are they getting adequate protections?

A recent lawsuit prompted the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) on July 17 to propose 36 ocean areas as critical habitat for threatened loggerhead sea turtles along the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico. The lawsuit, jointly filed by Oceana, the Center for Biological Diversity and the Turtle Island Restoration Network, came five years after environmental groups petitioned the government to strengthen protections for loggerhead populations, and 35 years after loggerheads were first listed under the Endangered Species Act, at which time the government was required to designate critical habitat by law. This prolonged delay impelled environmental organizations to take legal action to ensure that the threats these sea turtles face are minimized.


Continue reading...

Government Officials, and Sea Turtles

© OCEANA / Carlos Minguell

This post comes to us from our Oceana offices in Europe. Click here to read the post in the original Spanish version. 

August 7, 2013

In an event attended by José Ramón Bauzá, the President of the government of the Balearic Islands, and Gabriel Company, Minister of Agriculture, Environment and Territory, the Cabrera National Park hosted the yearly tradition of returning rescued sea turtles to the sea. This event inspires us to take a moment to recognize the benefits of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) like the Cabrera National Park -- safe havens that are essential to the conservation of loggerhead sea turtles and many other species.


Continue reading...

It's Endangered Species Day!

The Endangered Species Act protects endangered and critically endangered creatures like this loggerhead sea turtle. Still, there is much work to be done. 

May 17th is the day to show your love for endangered sea turtles, whales, dolphins, and all sorts of marine creatures.  Why? Because it’s Endangered Species Day! Today is the day to learn and share information about your favorite endangered animals and rally support around the creatures that need it most.


Continue reading...

Endangered Sea Turtles Face Increased Threats

Endangered loggerheads will be subject to 100% higher catch ©Oceana

After a victory for Pacific sea turtles last week, here’s some not so good news. 

Two endangered species of sea turtle are facing an increased threat after the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) approved a plan allowing a Hawaii-based shallow-set longline swordfish fishery to catch more endangered sea turtles while hunting for swordfish in the North Pacific Ocean.

Currently, regulations allow a capture, or “take,” of 16 endangered leatherback sea turtles and 17 endangered loggerhead sea turtles per fishery per year. If and when turtle catch limits are reached, the fishery must close for the year. However, the new rule, set to take effect November 5, will allow a 62 percent increase in allowable takes of leatherbacks for a total of 26 per year, and a 100 percent increase in the catch of loggerheads for a total of 34 per year. 

The timing for this approval is particularly paradoxical, as NMFS upgraded the status of the Pacific loggerhead sea turtle from “threatened” to “endangered” little more than a year ago, and designated almost 42,000 square miles of ocean waters off the coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington as critical habitat for leatherback sea turtles earlier this year. The leatherback sea turtle was also recently designated as the official state marine reptile of California.

Ben Enticknap, Pacific Project Manager for Oceana, said:

This decision is outrageous. On the one hand the federal government acknowledges Pacific leatherback and loggerhead sea turtles are endangered and that more needs to be done to protect them. At the same time they say it is okay for U.S. fishermen to kill more of them.”

We agree, it’s outrageous – and our campaigners are examining the available options in a plan to stop these measures before they take effect on November 5. We’ll keep you posted!


Continue reading...

Victory: Power Plant Defeated in Chile

seagrass meadows

Seagrass near where the power plant would have been built. © Oceana/Eduardo Sorensen 

Great news from Chile: A planned coal-fired plant, located dangerously close to several biodiverse marine habitats, was shot down by the Chilean Supreme Court on Tuesday.

Coal-powered thermoelectric power plants are notoriously dangerous to the environment. This plant was planned for the Punta Cachos area off of Chile’s northern coast, just a few kilometers from important habitats for Humboldt penguins, sea turtles, and one of Chile’s few seagrass meadows. As part of its operations, the plant would have released warm water into the ocean. This change in temperature could have affected the entire ecosystem, reducing the numbers of mollusks, crustaceans, jellyfish, algae, and sea grasses, all of which are food for the local sea turtle colony.

Despite initial approval by the local environmental commission, this power plant is opposed by the local community of Totoral and various other organizations, including Oceana. The community of Totoral fought against the plan and won a victory, getting their approval revoked, but the company appealed, bringing the case to the Supreme Court. We are pleased that, in the end, the Supreme Court sided with the community, and the oceans.

Oceana’s team in Chile has been working hard to fight against the pollution caused by plants and factories like this one, which affect the coastal ecosystems as well the safety of the local air and water. Congrats to all who helped win this victory for Chile's oceans!


Continue reading...

Canary Islands Threatened by Oil Prospecting Plans

Yellow gorgonia coral  and red sea fan in the Canary Islands.  © Oceana/Carlos Minguell

The Canary Islands are in the oil industry’s crosshairs, and that spells danger for the area’s marine habitats and wildlife.

In a new report, Oceana has denounced oil prospecting plans in the Canary Islands, highlighting the dangerous impact of these activities on cold-water coral reefs, deep sponge fields, hydrothermal vents, and nearly 100 protected species.

Spanish oil company Repsol is planning to prospect in the Canary Islands Channel, located off the northwest coast of Africa. The channel contains gas-based habitats that are protected under the Habitats Directive. These habitats support coral and sponge communities that would be destroyed by oil prospecting activity.

A total of 25 protected areas and 82 endangered species would be threatened by Repsol’s prospecting activities. These include sea turtles, short finned pilot whales, angel sharks, bottlenose dolphins, and a variety of fish.

The International Maritime Organization has declared the Canary Islands a Particularly Sensitive Area for its biological wealth and its economic dependence. This status affords the islands’ strict protection in terms of waste and pollution.

The Canary Islands is an archipelago supported by fishing and tourism. Both of these industries rely on the islands’ high biodiversity—more than 600 species and 350 communities and habitats. Oil prospecting would interfere with fishing and tourism, and reduce the biodiversity of the area.

We'll be sure to keep you posted!


Continue reading...

What Motivates You?

OH_motivation

To be an Ocean Hero, you have to have a strong commitment to your work—so what keeps our finalists going when the going gets tough?

The voting is open for our 2012 Ocean Heroes Awards, but if you're having a hard time deciding who your favorite finalist is, here's a chance to get to know them better.

Each of our finalists has their own unique story about just what it is that motivates them to protect the world’s oceans. Here’s what they told us keeps them working hard to achieve their goals:

Adults

Michele Hunter Sometimes it's witnessing the small steps a critical patient will take because of the dutiful care and treatment we provide to our patients.  Knowing that all those hours of care made a difference. Being able to stand on the beach with your team and release an animal that you helped save is motivation enough!

Hardy Jones Frankly, what motivates me is the undeniable need for reform of the way we view and deal with the oceans. There is real danger of a collapse of the ocean ecosystem. Other motivation comes from direct contact with the magnificence of the ocean realm. Finally, I am motivated by the knowledge that I can make a difference if I put out the energy and intention to accomplish important goals.

Kristofor Lofgren I want to live in a healthy and beautiful world.  I also want to do all I can to share that wonderful world with others.  I am motived each and every day to help make the world a better place for everyone I never meet, simply because it is the right thing to do.  We all breathe the same air, drink the same water, and share the same earth.  I choose each day to bring passion to simple, good work...and that is enough.

Dave Rauschkolb The unapologetic grip the dirty fuel and nuclear industries have on our world, and seeing that clean energy and renewables are beginning to break that grip.

Rick Steiner I'm motivated by knowing the desperate state of the oceans, seeing my favorite seas and coasts lost to human ignorance and greed, and facilitating the successes I've been involved with.  There is simply no other option but to ramp up the science-based advocacy for ocean protection -- and that is a powerful motivator.  It is urgent to act, not just talk about the problem.  Knowing we can, and must, succeed.

Don Voss I am motivated by the thousands of kids I talk to each year who are interested and react to this project.  I help at least 25 new divers a year get started and into this sport and debris collection.  I am motivated by the progress in removal and changes in water quality we are finding just this year.  I am motivated when others notice what we do and want to participate and/or learn more.  I am motivated when we continue to release thousands of snagged and trapped aquatic animals.  I am spiritually motivated when I visit our Turtle rescue hospital and visit the critters we have sent there.  Turtles are awesome and send me home an activist.

Juniors

Sara Brenes I am so passionate about my belief and my drive to make a difference. I feel like I breathe, eat, sleep, and dream about sharks and our oceans. I think it is just hard wired in to me to not give up and to fight and fight and fight and reach another person and another person and another one. Just don't stop!

The Calvineers The North Atlantic right whale is the most endangered large whale in the world.  Their population has grown little in the last thirty years (from about 300 to about 450), way below the estimated 2-3,000 needed for recovery.  Until the whales recover, the Calvineers will keep up their work of educating the public.

Sam Harris I do it for the sharks. I love them.

James Hemphill My love of the ocean keeps me going.  This is a problem that will not go away.  As long as there is a large human population, there will be conflicts with the environment that need solutions.  I want to be a part of those solutions.  I have a stubborn determination to see cleaner oceans.  This is where I play, swim, surf, fish, and kayak.  I want my children to experience the same beautiful environment that I have.

Teakahla WhiteCloud Knowing that I am saving hatchlings so that the ocean will continue to live so that I will have a future to live.

Don’t forget to visit oceana.org/heroes and vote for your favorite adult and junior finalists. There’s less than a week until the voting period is over!

Photo Credits (clockwise from top left): Courtesy Hardy Jones, Oceana/Dustin Cranor, zeroXTE.com, Oceana/Carlos Minguell, Courtesy James Hemphill, Oceana/Eduardo Sorenson, Courtesy Sara Brenes, NOAA, Courtesy Michele Hunter, Courtesy Kristofor Lofgren, Flickr/Nemo’s Great Uncle (middle).


Continue reading...


Browse by Date