The Beacon

Blog Tags: Shrimp

CEO Note: New Oceana Study Finds Shrimp Widely Mislabeled around The U.S.

New Oceana study found widespread mislabeling of shrimp

(Photo: Oceana)

As a supporter of Oceana, you’re already familiar with our campaign to stop seafood fraud. Last week, Oceana released a new scientific report revealing that 30 percent of shrimp products tested from grocery stores and restaurants were misrepresented. The only known study of its kind in the U.S., the report also revealed that consumers are often provided with little information about the shrimp they purchase, including where and how it was caught or even if it was farmed, making it nearly impossible for consumers to make informed and sustainable seafood choices.


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Five Must-Know Facts about The Shrimp You Eat from Oceana’s Recent Report

Oceana uncovered widespread misrepresentation of shrimp

(Photo: Oceana)

As America’s favorite seafood, there’s a good chance you’ve consumed shrimp before, whether that be as shrimp salad, shrimp scampi, or battered coconut shrimp. And while all of those dishes are absolutely delicious, consumers don’t often realize what they’re getting when they order “shrimp.”


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Photos: What Kind of Shrimp Is Actually on Your Dinner Plate?

Oceana's new report on shrimp found widespread shrimp misrepresentation

(Photo: Oceana)

Who doesn’t love shrimp? Delicious on salads, sandwiches, and as a main dish, it’s no wonder that it’s the most commonly consumed seafood in the U.S., and the most traded seafood in the world. But, did you know that when you order a shrimp cocktail or shrimp scampi, your “shrimp” could actually be one of dozens of different species of shrimp, as well as domestic or imported, and wild caught or farmed? Most consumers don’t realize that “shrimp” is a highly ambiguous term that refers to different shrimp species of many possible different origins.


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Uncovering Shrimp Seafood Fraud: Diaries from the Field, Part One

Oceana uncovered widespread misrepresentation of shrimp

(Photo: Rachel Golden)

Yesterday, Oceana released a new report that uncovered widespread misrepresentation of America’s favorite seafood: shrimp. The report found 30 percent of DNA-tested shrimp samples to be misrepresented—often mislabeled for another species or said to be wild caught when it was farmed—across more than 100 restaurants and grocery stores nationwide.


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Ocean Roundup: Seagrass Travels via Ocean Currents, Plump Leatherbacks Can Swim More Easily, and More

Seagrass is found to travel via ocean currents and ocean animals

Seagrass meadows off Spain. (Photo: Oceana / Sergio Gosálvez)

- New research shows that seagrass has an incredible ability to spread over vast distances of the ocean, which gives them an ability to migrate with climate change and be able to recover from habitat disturbance. The scientists found that seagrass fruit and flowers spread by hitching rides on ocean animals, in animal feces, and in ocean currents. Phys.org


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Graphics: New Oceana Study Finds Shrimp Misrepresented in the U.S.

A new Oceana study found shrimp to be misrepresented

(Photo: Oceana)

Today, Oceana released a new study that found shrimp, America’s favorite seafood, to be misrepresented in the United States. In the only known study of its kind in the U.S., DNA testing confirmed that 30 percent of 143 tested shrimp products—found in 111 restaurants and grocery stores—were misrepresented.


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Every Shrimp Has a Tale

(Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

October is National Seafood Month, and to celebrate this event, seafood lovers may be getting ready to partake in their favorite dishes. But how does the average consumer know where their seafood was caught? Can they be sure what they are eating is what is on the label or menu?


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Bien Hecho! Costa Rica Bans Shrimp Trawl Nets

This image shows how trawl nets effectively "bulldoze" the sea floor, destroying centuries' old coral formations and catching anything in their path. 

We are excited to share some great news out of our international offices – Costa Rica has banned the use of trawl nets to catch shrimp throughout the country! Trawl nets destroy our oceans -- ripping up the seafloor, razing coral reefs, and catching huge amounts of marine creatures as bycatch – so this ruling is a major victory for our oceans. It’s estimated that 871,000 tons of bony fishes, sharks, and rays were caught in Costa Rica as incidental bycatch of shrimp trawling between 1950 and 2008.


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Oceana CEO Andy Sharpless's New Book, The Perfect Protein, Released Today!

The Perfect Protein Trailer from Oceana on Vimeo.

We're thrilled to announce that today is the launch of Oceana CEO Andy Sharpless's new book, The Perfect Protein! As the CEO of Oceana, Andy is dedicated to the protection of our world’s oceans. Over the years, however, he realized that the work Oceana does to save the world’s oceans was not just helping to preserve the oceans’ biodiversity; it was also resulting in more food for people. In other words, it’s a win-win: When we adopt practices that conserve and protect our oceans and the creatures in it, we also create stocks of healthy, nutritious protein for the people of our world.


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A Carbon Footprint that Isn’t Shrimpy

shrimp cocktail

Image via Wikimedia Commons.

According to new estimates, farmed shrimp from Asia may have one of the highest carbon footprints of any food.

More than half of all shrimp farms are located in Asia, primarily in areas that used to be mangrove forests. Mangroves are trees that grow in salt water, and they are important for marine ecosystems because they provide nutrients and shelter for many fish, turtle, and wading bird species. Mangrove forests are also important because they serve as a carbon sink, removing and storing more than 1,000 pounds of CO2) per acre each year.

But around the world, mangrove forests are being cut down to build shrimp farms. These farms are also often short-lived. The intensive farming methods pollute the environment, and disease spreads easily among the shrimp, which means that shrimp farmers must frequently clear new areas to stay in business.


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