Our Victories

Since 2001, Oceana has achieved dozens of concrete policy victories for marine life and habitats. From stopping bottom trawling in sensitive habitat areas to protecting sea turtles from commercial fishing gear, our victories represent a new hope for the world’s oceans.

National Marine Fisheries Service to Maintain Protections for Critical Rockfish Conservation Areas

Abril, 2014

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) issued a final rule to maintain approximately 12,620 square miles of existing conservation area in order to protect overfished rockfish populations off the U.S. West Coast.  This decision was a direct response to scientific information submitted by Oceana, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD). All three organizations are working together to ensure the recovery of overfished rockfish species and the conservation of ocean habitats. Cold-water corals and underwater reefs are among other seafloor habitats that will remain closed to bottom trawling under this final rule. Oceana, NRDC and other organizations have active conservation proposals before the Pacific Council that would designate parts of the “Rockfish Conservation Area” (RCA) as “Essential Fish Habitat” conservation areas, closed to bottom trawling. 

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Senate Finance Committee Clears Way for Extension of Critically Important Investment Tax Credit for Offshore Wind

Abril, 2014

The United States Senate Committee on Finance cleared the way for a two-year extension of the investment tax credit (ITC) for offshore wind projects. Construction began before the end of 2015. The credit was allowed to expire on December 31, 2013.

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Shark Fin Bans Upheld

Febrero, 2014

Last year, NOAA challenged state shark fin bans across the country, suggesting that they might be preempted, or overruled, by federal law. State shark fin laws protect sharks by banning the sale, trade, distribution and possession of shark fins, effectively shutting down the market for shark fins. In response to NOAAs actions, Oceana launched a public awareness campaign, running high-visibility Metro ads at stations near NOAA’s offices and sending a letter to NOAA signed by more than 24,000 activists urging the agency not to jeopardize state bans and their benefits for sharks. In early 2014 NOAA removed its challenge to California, Maryland and Washington’s shark fin laws. We are confident that NOAA will also drop their challenges in the remaining five states.


Arctic Drilling Halted for 2014

Enero, 2014

In late January, Shell’s new CEO announced that the company will not pursue any exploration drilling in the Arctic Ocean in 2014. This news came days after the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals found that the Department of the Interior violated U.S. law in deciding to hold drilling Lease Sale 193, during which Shell  and other oil companies purchased leases in the Chukchi Sea. This ruling is in response to a lawsuit filed by Oceana and a coalition of conservation and Alaska Native partners, represented by Earthjustice. Shell encountered numerous problems and violations during its 2012 exploration attempt, including an incident when its drilling rig, the Kulluk, ran aground during a winter storm. Currently, there is no proven technology that would allow companies to drill safely in the Arctic. Despite Shell’s attempts, no exploration wells have been completed in the Arctic Ocean in more than 20 years.

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EU Moves Away from Harmful Subsidies

Enero, 2014

European Parliament and the Fisheries Council reached a political agreement on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, the financial mechanism that will allow the implementation of the reformed Common Fisheries Policy over the next seven years. Previous fisheries subsidies schemes have given priority to short-term economic interests at the expense of sustainability, using taxpayer’s money to increase fleet capacity and fund overfishing.

Oceana supports the efforts of the European Parliament and Council to stop this toxic pattern, and shift spending towards beneficial measures such as control and data collection. However, Oceana also acknowledges that the EU must move further to make a clean break from harmful subsidies, including recognizing risks associated with certain environmentally harmful subsidies, like those for new engines and the temporary cessation of fishing activity.


Chile Establishes Science-based Fishing Quotas

Diciembre, 2013

In late December, the Chilean government announced the first set of science-backed quotas for 2014. With guidance from scientific committees, the Chilean government set quotas for four critical species of fish: common hake, anchoveta, sardines, and jack mackerel.  The reductions are dramatic—the government reduced the quota for common hake by 55 percent, for anchoveta by 65 percent in specific regions, and for sardines by 29 percent in specific regions. Chile’s first science-informed quotas are a tremendous step toward reforming fisheries and ensuring that the oceans remain a plentiful source of food.


Mediterranean Deep-Sea Corals Protected

Diciembre, 2013

Mediterranean countries and the EU decided to protect 11 species of deep-sea corals at the 18th COP to the Barcelona Convention. They also decided to implement the Action Plan on Dark Habitats, a scientific document drafted in part by Oceana, which will enable the creation of marine protected areas in deep-sea habitats like seamounts, submarine canyons, and caves. Many of these deep-sea habitats are unprotected, despite being extremely vulnerable to human activities like pollution, overfishing, and climate change.


Pacific Sardine Catch Levels Decreased

Noviembre, 2013

After campaigning by Oceana and our allies, the Pacific Fishery Management Council voted reduce the 2014 sardine catch levels by 33 percent to help halt dramatic declines in this important species. Since 2007, the Pacific sardine population has fallen by almost 979,000 tons and is at its lowest biomass in two decades, according to a population assessment released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in October. Declines in the sardine population will negatively impact the many Pacific species that rely on these fish for food, including Chinook salmon, bluefin tuna, brown pelicans, dolphins, and large whales.

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Emergency Rules Implemented to Protect Endangered Sperm Whales from California Drift Gillnets

Septiembre, 2013

On September 3, the National Marine Fisheries Service issued emergency regulations that will shut down California’s drift gillnet fishery if a single endangered sperm whale is caught. The fishery kills more whales and other marine mammals than any other fishery along the U.S. West Coast and has one of the highest bycatch rates in the country. These rules will also require independent observers on all drift gillnet vessels operating in offshore waters deeper than 6,500 feet. The rules will be enforced by requiring new vessel monitoring systems tracking the locations of all drift gillnet vessels off the U.S. West Coast.  

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Seismic Airgun Use Prevented on the Atlantic Coast

Agosto, 2013

The Department of the Interior postponed a decision on whether to allow seismic airgun use in 300,000 square miles of ocean off the Atlantic coast. This is the third time Oceana has successfully helped delay the decision. The government’s estimates predict that seismic testing would disrupt critical behaviors like feeding, calving, and breeding for many marine creatures, including dolphins, whales, and loggerhead sea turtles. At least 138,500 dolphins and whales will be injured, or possibly killed, if airguns are allowed in the mid-Atlantic. Coastal fisheries in seven states would also be impacted, as airguns can lower catch rates between 40 and 80 percent.