Kemp's ridley sea turtle

kemp's ridley

In the late 1940s, tens of thousands of Kemp's ridley sea turtles nested near Rancho Nuevo in Mexico, the turtles' primary nesting beach. However, by the late 1980's, only a few hundred adult females returned, demonstrating the population's dramatic decline.

The introduction of turtle exluder devices (TEDs) in shrimp trawls and conservation efforts in Mexico have allowed the Kemp's ridleysea turtle population to slowly recover.

While the number of nesting females has increased from hundreds to thousands, the Kemp's ridley sea turtle still needs protection. Major threats include being caught in fishing gear, habitat destruction, expanding human populations and the effects of global warming on sex ratios.