the economist

Competing Pressures for the Arctic

Posted Fri, Mar 8, 2013 by Sarah Williamson to arctic, the economist

The Arctic is a fragile ecosystem sitting alone at the top of the world.

Well, it used to be alone.  Now, countries and corporations are competing for a share of its economic potential—its rich natural resources, untapped energy sources, and emerging trade routes.

On March 12 The Economist is hosting its Arctic Summit in Oslo, where 150 interested policy-makers, CEOs and influential commentators will come together to discuss the possibilities for a responsibly governed Arctic.

At Oceana we work hard to protect the Arctic’s marine ecosystem and the subsistence life of its peoples.  In order to make real progress, all of the intersecting threats—climate change, industrial fishing, shipping, pollution, and oil and gas development—need to be addressed together.  You can make a difference in the Arctic by signing Oceana’s petition to stop oil and gas drilling.

We commend The Economist and all of the Arctic Summit participants for taking on such an important and critical set of issues.

Stay tuned for an update from our own Nicolas Fournier, who will be representing Oceana at the conference.


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Feeding the World with Wild Seafood

Posted Tue, Jan 29, 2013 by Sarah Williamson to Amsterdam, food security, Save the Ocean: Feed the World, sustainable fishing, the economist

The Economist hosts it's Feeding the World summit this week in Amsterdam.

What food requires no fresh water, produces little carbon dioxide, does not use any arable land, and provides healthy, lean protein at a cost accessible to the world’s poor?

WILD SEAFOOD.

This is the same question our very own CEO Andrew Sharpless will be asking audience members at The Economist’s “Feeding the World” conference this week in Amsterdam.

In addition to Oceana, other experts from agribusiness, policy, science, and the NGO community will join the conversation by discussing and debating the future of food security as the world population grows toward 9 billion by 2050.

Andy will contribute to this prestigious global conversation by presenting Oceana’s “Save the Oceans: Feed the World” initiative which details the benefits of wild fish as a food source. He’ll explain the many advantages wild fish has over traditional agriculture, especially in developing countries, as it’s cheap and accessible to anyone with a hook or a net and requires no ownership of land or access to fresh water.

The best part is that we already know how to maximize the ocean’s potential as a food source. It requires the same steps we’re already taking to preserve biodiversity, such as reducing bycatch, protecting habitat and enforcing scientific quotas. We just have to do it in the right places.

If managed effectively in the 25 countries that control 75% of the world’s fish stocks, wild fish will be abundant enough to feed 12 billion people by 2050, which far exceeds the current population projections. Andy will explain that by protecting our dwindling fish stocks and focusing on effective fisheries management in the top fishing nations, fish can become the perfect protein of the future.

Andy has discussed Oceana’s efforts in previous presentations, but The Economist’s conference is especially timely given the European Union’s recent action to curb overfishing in its waters.

Learn more about how saving the oceans can feed the world.


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BBC Interviews Andy Sharpless at World Oceans Summit

Posted Tue, Mar 20, 2012 by Emily Fisher to andy sharpless, bbc, food security, overfishing, sustainable fishing, the economist, world oceans summit

Last month our CEO Andy Sharpless attended the Economist's World Oceans Summit in Singapore. He spoke to the BBC about the importance of sustainable fishing to the future of global food security, check out the interview and pass it on:


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Last Chance to Register for the World Oceans Summit

Posted Fri, Feb 10, 2012 by Emily Fisher to andrew sharpless, ceo andy sharpless, events, singapore, the economist, world oceans summit

Happy Friday, all!

We just wanted to remind you about the The Economist's fast-approaching World Oceans Summit where 200 global leaders, including our CEO Andy Sharpless, will discuss the future of our oceans.

The summit, which takes place in Singapore from Feb. 22-24, will offer a robust examination of the future of the seas, the importance of the sustainable use of the oceans, and what this means for business.

Featured speakers include:

There are only a handful of seats left, and as an Oceana supporter, you are entitled to a special 20% discount off the standard ticket price – simply enter the code OCEANA to enjoy the special rate.

Register here, and if you have any questions or require further information, contact Alice Wong at (+852) 2585 3312 or alicewong@economist.com.


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Oceana at The Economist World Oceans Summit

Posted Tue, Dec 20, 2011 by Emily Fisher to andy sharpless, ocean conservation summit, oceana ceo, singapore, sylvia earle, the economist, world oceans summit

We’re excited to announce that The Economist World Oceans Summit will take place in late February – and our CEO Andy Sharpless will be there representing Oceana.

The Summit will take place in Singapore from February 22nd-24th, and Sharpless will be joined by more than 200 global leaders in business, government, academia and NGOs, including famed oceanographer Sylvia Earle, NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco, National Geographic explorer-in-residence Enric Sala, and many others.

We’re glad to see the The Economist devoting this summit to the oceans, and with such an extraordinary group of panelists and attendees, we hope the event will produce a constructive dialogue on solutions to the oceans’ biggest threats. You can learn more about the summit program and register your place at the summit at www.economist.com/worldoceanssummit.

You can also join in the ocean discussion on the Economist website prompted by Sharpless’ question: Is it inevitable that global fisheries will be depleted? Go ahead, weigh in!


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