The Beacon

Blog Tags: Bycatch

Setback for Shark Conservation: Hammerhead Sharks Denied Protection under Endangered Species Act

A great hammerhead shark (Sphyrna mokarran)

A great hammerhead shark (Sphyrna mokarran). (Photo: Wendell Reed / Flickr Creative Commons)

Last month, scientists, conservationists, and the ecotourism industry alike were all disappointed when the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) determined that the great hammerhead shark will not be listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). NMFS also decided against listing scalloped hammerhead sharks in the U.S. last year, a motion that was finalized this month.


Continue reading...

CEO Note: “Wasted Cash” Report Reveals Staggering Cost of Bycatch

Bycatch

(Photo: Oceana / María José Cornax)

Discarding fish is akin to throwing money into the ocean, yet the U.S. fishing industry wastes millions of pounds of seafood each year. Bycatch is not only wasteful, but kills countless numbers of marine creatures like dolphins, sea turtles, and sharks in the process.


Continue reading...

Fishery Managers Move to Clean up the California Swordfish Drift Gillnet Fishery

sperm whale

A sperm whale. (Photo: Oceana / Juan Cuetos)

The Pacific Fishery Management Council recently made a historic move by voting to clean up the California swordfish drift gillnet fishery—one of the dirtiest U.S. fisheries for bycatch.


Continue reading...

New Oceana Report Unveils Wasted Cash in U.S. Fisheries

Wasted Cash report shows the striking cost of bycatch.

(Photo: Oceana)

Bycatch, the capture and waste of non-target fish and ocean wildlife, costs fishermen and the marine environment in more ways than one.  In addition to being ecologically wasteful, discarding fish is akin to throwing money into the ocean.  Today, Oceana released a new report that spotlights the economic losses from bycatch—an amount that could reach a staggering $1 billion annually.   


Continue reading...

Oceana Wins Bycatch Victories from Northeast Fisheries Managers

(Photo: Oceana / Marek Budniak)

Last week, the New England Fishery Management Council took an important step forward for ocean conservation by agreeing to allocate $800,000 to support fishery research in the struggling groundfish fishery for cod, haddock and flounder. The Council has funds to support several projects and included bycatch reduction and solutions as themes in the call for research proposals.


Continue reading...

Hammerhead Shark Management Should Reflect Unique Evolutionary Traits, Scientists Say

A school of scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini)

A school of scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini). (Photo: Oceana / Rob Stewart)

Known for their mallet-shaped heads, hammerhead sharks are one of the most easily recognized—and favored—shark species. Their “hammers” give them a widened-view to scan for food, and they have enhanced sensory organs that can detect electrical fields from their prey. If that doesn’t make hammerheads cool enough, they can grow to incredible sizes—reaching 20 feet in length and weighing up to 1,000 pounds.


Continue reading...

House Committee Approves Bill that Moves Fisheries Management Backward

Loggerhead sea turtle caught on a longline

A Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) caught on a longline in the Mediterranean. (Photo: Oceana / Mar Mas)

Responsible fisheries management took a hit today as the House Committee on Natural Resources passed a bill that threatens to undo the significant progress the United States has made in reversing the effects of decades of overfishing and making the U.S. a world leader in fisheries management. H.R. 4742, sponsored by committee chairman Doc Hastings (R-WA), would reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA), our nation’s primary fisheries management law.


Continue reading...

Reducing Bycatch Casualties, One Whale at a Time

(Photo: Howard Ignatius)

As mentioned in our recently released Wasted Catch report, whales, dolphins, porpoises and other marine life are victims of bycatch, which is the catch of non-target fish and marine animals. Whales can become entangled in nets or trail fishing lines and gear that wraps around their fins, causing injuries and distress as the animals struggle to swim and reach the surface for air.


Continue reading...

New Research Reveals Bycatch Hotspots

(Photo: Oceana \ Carlos Perez)

Out on the water, fishermen are notorious for both catching non-target fish and for entangling or killing many other marine animals, including dolphins, seals, whales, and sea turtles. Known as “bycatch,” these victims usually end up dead and thrown back overboard. The severity of the bycatch problem around the world has been uncertain, until now, because it can be difficult to gather data about just how many animals are caught as bycatch


Continue reading...

CEO Note: New Report Unveils Wasted Seafood

(Photo: Oceana)

We can all agree that wasting food is unacceptable. So why are U.S. fisheries allowed to throw away perfectly edible seafood? Many fisheries toss fish and other species overboard, usually dead or dying, simply because it’s not the type of seafood they are trying to catch. And the government allows this wasteful practice. A new Oceana report published this week reveals nine of our country’s most wasteful fisheries.


Continue reading...

Browse by Date