The Beacon: Justine Hausheer's blog

A Perfect Recipe for National Seafood Month

(Photo: Swamibu)

October is National Seafood Month, and we have a warm, rich shellfish dish that's perfect for the cool fall evenings. We featured Chef April Bloomfield's delicious recipe "Oyster Pan Roast with Tarragon Toasts" in the recent issuse of Oceana magazine. Read an excerpt about Chelf Bloomfield below, and then visit the Continue reading...

Creature Feature: Reef Lizardfish

This good-looking creature is a reef lizardfish. (Photo: Colby Bidwell) 

You won’t find land-dwelling lizards scampering about coral reefs, but you might do a double-take when you see the reef lizardfish. Also known as variegated lizardfish, these strange reef-dwellers look surprisingly like lizards. They’re found in coral reefs throughout Indonesia and along the coast of India and northern Australia.


Continue reading...

Behind the Scenes: Seafood Fraud

(Photo: Oceana / Jenn Hueting)

October is National Seafood month—the perfect time to dig in to all of the delicious dishes that come from the sea. But before you head to the market, you should read up on the nation-wide issue of seafood fraud.


Continue reading...

Ted Danson Sets the Record Straight on Farmed Salmon

Farmed salmon are not a sustainable seafood alternative. (Photo: Oceana / Jenn Hueting)

Last week we wrote about the Washington Post’s misleading article on farmed salmon. Since then, Oceana CEO Andy Sharpless teamed up with actor and ocean activist Ted Danson to set the record straight in an editorial for the Huffington Post.


Continue reading...

A Blue Whale’s Life Story Revealed Through Ear Wax

Blue whales are probably the largest animal that has ever lived. (Photo: NOAA Photo Library) 

Instead of our weekly Creature Feature, we’d like share an awesome new finding about one well-known ocean creature, the blue whale. Scientists discovered that earwax can reveal amazingly details about the life of whales, according to a study published last week in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Continue reading...

The Washington Post is Wrong About Farmed Salmon

Parasitic sea lice from farmed salmon can spread to wild fish nearby. (Photo: Pure Salmon Campaign )

Today the Washington Post ran an article in their Food section lauding advances in the salmon farming industry. Their message? Farmed salmon are a good choice.

We’re here to set the record straight: farmed salmon are not a sustainable seafood choice, and they’re not good for the oceans. If you want to be a responsible seafood eater, therefore, you should not eat farmed salmon.


Continue reading...

Sheryl Crow Editorial Calls for an Airgun-free Atlantic

The government estimates that seismic airguns will injure at least 138,500 dolphins and whales. (Photo: Mike Legend) 

Oceana’s efforts to fight seismic airgun use in the Atlantic are off to a strong start. Right now our activists are conducting forums in nine different states to educate residents about the dangers of airguns.


Continue reading...

Creature Feature: Magnificent Frigatebird

Yes, that’s a bird, and yes, it’s supposed to look like that. (Photo: Mark Vance)

Magnificent frigatebirds aren’t the beauty queens of the bird world, but they do get points for bold style. These seabirds have a seven foot wingspan and an inflatable, bright-red throat sac under their bills that they used in elaborate courtship displays. Only the males have these sacs—female frigatebirds have a non-inflatable white neck, making them the only seabird species where the males and females look very different.


Continue reading...

The Amazing Disappearing Octopus

Now you see me, now you don’t. (Photo: Snailgenie) 

This amazing video has been making the rounds on the internet for a while, be we still couldn’t resist sharing it with you! You may know that an octopus can change the color of its skin to blend in with its surroundings. But did you know they were this good?


Continue reading...

Fleet of Gliding Robots Collect Ocean Data

A slocum glider, with its wings, is prepped before deployment. (Photo: Christena MacDonald, OTN/MEOPAR)

It’s a bird… it’s a plane… it’s an ocean-going robot! Scientists from the United States and Canada are teaming up to launch up to 14 ocean-monitoring robotic gliders. These gliders are collecting data on ocean conditions and marine life along the eastern seaboard, traveling from the coast to the edge of the continental shelf.


Continue reading...

Browse by Date