Blog

  • Save Our Sharks

    Author: Angela Pauly
    Date: November 15, 2011

    Did you know that only 1% of the highly migratory sharks reported caught in the Atlantic are protected from overfishing by ICCAT?

    Did you know that 75% of the highly migratory sharks caught in ICCAT fisheries are classified as threatened in parts of the Atlantic by the IUCN?

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  • It's ICCAT time again!

    Author: Angela Pauly
    Date: November 11, 2011

    It’s ICCAT time again! This week an international team of Oceana experts headed to Turkey to seek protection for sharks and swordfish, both of which are overfished, at the 22nd Regular Meeting of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT).

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  • Wednesday Wisdom: Predator, scavenger and a cannibal from the ice age

    Author: Signe Damkjaer
    Date: November 2, 2011

    The Saduria entomon is a true survivor. Take a look at this picture, and there will be no doubt that you are looking into the eyes of a predator. It eats amphipods such as monoporeia affinis mussels, freshwater lice and larvae. Even more macabre is that it’s also an omnivorous scavenger feeding on dead fish and other dead organisms it finds at the bottom of the sea.

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  • Beware the mutant fish

    Author: Angela Pauly
    Date: October 31, 2011

    No need for costumes, fake cobwebs or scary music, this Halloween edition of our blog features an unfortunate real life monster. Take a look at the “lovely” image of a mutant, 3-eyed wolffish found near a nuclear plant in Argentina.

    Three-Eyed Fish Caught Near Argentinian Nuclear Power Plant  Read more: Three-Eyed Fish Caught Near Argentinian Nuclear Power Plant | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World

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  • Friday Meet & Greet: The Ambush of the Anemone

    Author: Angela Pauly
    Date: October 28, 2011

    Today’s Meet & Greet looks like its straight out of a horror movie! Trust me, this video is a MUST SEE – it catches you so off guard, one second you are wondering what it is you are supposed to be looking at, and then before you know it, this creepy hand looking thing is coming out of the ground – and well…I won’t ruin the surprise, see for yourself:  We’ve called it the Ambush of the Anemone – watch and enjoy! There is no sound, but that just ups the creepiness factor.

     

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  • Safety measures in offshore drilling: the EU misses its chance

    Author: Angela Pauly
    Date: October 27, 2011

    You know what’s frustrating? When a chance to fix something that is so clearly in need of fixing is passed over. This time around, it has to do with safety in European offshore drilling activities

    You’d think after the lessons learned from BP’s Deepwater Horizon spill, the European Commission would be doing everything they could to make sure such a disaster never occurs in European waters…and yet today, when EU Energy Commissioner Oettinger presented his long awaited proposal to regulate offshore oil and gas activities in Europe, we learned they didn’t.

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  • Dead men's fingers - a cosy soft coral

    Author: Signe Damkjaer
    Date: October 26, 2011

    Dead men's fingers, Kattegat Denmark. © OCEANA / Carlos Minguell

    If you still dont know how to dress up for this weekend's Halloween-party, how about this soft coral. Dead men’s fingers  (Alcyonium digitaturn) may have scared at least a diver or two. The conspicuous name reveals that the animal looks a bit like the swollen hand of a dead person. Dead men’s fingers is a soft coral  found in  coastal areas in the northern Atlantic, and  is common in most areas of the Baltic Sea.  The picture is from Kattegat, and was taken during Oceana’s expedition in the Baltic Sea in the spring 2011.

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  • Red Coral, Red Alert?

    Author: Angela Pauly
    Date: October 24, 2011

    Red coral (Corallium rubrum). Medas Islands, Gerona, Spain. Catamaran Oceana Ranger Mediterranean Expedition. July 2006. © OCEANA / Juan Cuetos

    Red coral (sometimes called precious coral) is widely used throughout the world for jewelry, and in beauty products.  The human “appetite” for this stunning coral, which dates as far back as ancient Greece and Egypt, when red coral was considered to have sacred properties, has unfortunately led to the destruction of many red coral colonies, and there are concerns about the sustainability of coral harvesting.

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  • Friday Meet & Greet: The Dusky Grouper

    Author: Angela Pauly
    Date: October 21, 2011

    Dusky grouper (Epinephelus marginatus) with the mouth opened in rocky seabed with algae. El Bajón, La Restinga-Mar de las Calmas Marine Reserve, El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. Canary Islands Oceana Ranger Expedition. September 2009. © OCEANA / Carlos Suárez

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  • Eelpout - closer to mammals than you might think

    Author: Signe Damkjaer
    Date: October 20, 2011

    Eelpout (Zoarces Viviparus) is one of the most common species in the Baltic Sea. It is also found in the coastal areas of North East Atlantic. Not much of looker, few people are aware how interesting a fish the eelpout actually is. Danish research has brought forward the extraordinary fact, that the eelpout suckle its offspring just like mammals. The eelpout belong to those around 750 fish species that give birth instead of laying eggs.

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