Chilean Navy and Oceana celebrate World Oceans Day with an interactive display | Oceana

Chilean Navy and Oceana celebrate World Oceans Day with an interactive display

The exhibition will be permanently on display at the National Maritime Museum. Its purpose is to create awareness on the importance of protecting oceans from pollution and the over exploitation of their resources.



Press Release Date

Thursday, June 8, 2017
Location: Valparaíso
Contact: Cristián Arroyo: carroyo@oceana.org +56 2 2925 5612

In the framework of the celebration of World Oceans Day and the Bicentennial of the Chilean Navy, the National Maritime Museum, together with the Oceana marine conservation organization, inaugurated the interactive exhibition "Save the Oceans to feed the world, " with the aim of highlighting the importance of protecting marine ecosystems from pollution and overexploitation of their resources, promoting sustainable fishing.

The Director of the Museum, Rear Admiral Christian Del Real, commented that the exhibition seeks to "increase our national maritime awareness, that all Chileans are aware of the importance of the sea for our development. On this World Oceans Day we implemented this educational exhibition that will allow our visitors to have a little more knowledge of the riches that are in our seas so that, knowing what there is, we may want our oceans a little more And take care of them more.

Oceana Chile's Executive Director, Liesbeth van der Meer, detailed the importance of these samples to the community, "in an era where threats such as pollution and overexploitation of fishery resources abound, it becomes extremely necessary for people Become aware of the importance of taking care of our sea. Today 60% of the Chilean fisheries are overexploited or depleted, that is, they are in serious danger of disappearing. For this reason, it is very important that through this exhibition, people can learn about this problem and ways on how to solve it. "

At present there are species of fish that are a source of food and work for millions of people, who are in critical condition. In the case of Chile, common hake, the fish that until some years ago was the most popular at the national tables, is overexploited. Several studies indicate that in the absence of immediate measures involving both authorities and consumers, in 10 years more common hake will disappear from our sea and our tables.

The interactive exhibition explains the risks of overfishing and the crisis of common hake, providing practical data on what we must do to contribute to its protection. The exhibition will be available from Tuesday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.